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Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis
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Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis

Revealed: How Ferrari is seeking extra downforce in Austria

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Revealed: How Ferrari is seeking extra downforce in Austria
By:
Co-author: Jake Boxall-Legge
Jun 28, 2019, 1:08 PM

Ferrari has trialled a new set of nose-mounted turning vanes in practice for the Austrian Grand Prix in a bid to overturn its current Formula 1 victory drought.

Arriving at the Red Bull Ring with two different configurations, Ferrari has augmented the new wing it brought last weekend with new turning vanes attached to the underside of the nose.

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Giorgio Piola’s image shows the new design, which features those turning vanes having been swept forward, along with another element added to enhance the overall control over the airflow in that area. Picking up the rotational flow produced by the front wing tips, the air is carried along and then directed out to the bargeboards.

Ferrari SF90, front wing

Ferrari SF90, front wing

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

This is in an effort to improve the overall downforce level of the Ferrari, and area in which it appears to have lacked throughout 2019. Furthermore, the wing mounting pylons have also changed, featuring a small horizontal knife-edge along the bottom of the slots.

This aims to assist with carrying the airflow underneath the nose and bulkhead of the car’s front end – all aiming to improve the flow structures further down the car. Here's another close-up look at that area...

Ferrari SF90, front

Ferrari SF90, front

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Red Bull’s nose scoop returns

After dropping its nose crash structure inlet at Monaco, Red Bull has reverted to type and brought it back in Austria.

Presumably aiming to improve its front end downforce with a more conventional crash structure, Red Bull has dropped that design after three races. Although the design generates a stronger high pressure region on top of the nose, it will also generate more drag – hindering the car’s performance on the straights.

Red Bull Racing RB15, front wing

Red Bull Racing RB15, front wing

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Returning to the scoop suggests that Red Bull is ready to dial in more straightline performance, boosted by its new specification of Honda power unite.

The scoop draws in airflow and fires it underneath the nose, aiming to trim off any high-pressure pockets that are generated through boundary layer separation.

Red Bull Racing RB15, front wing

Red Bull Racing RB15, front wing

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

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