Aragon MotoGP: Miller leads Espargaro in FP2, Marquez crashes

Ducati’s Jack Miller topped a tight second practice for the MotoGP Aragon Grand Prix, while FP1 pacesetter Marc Marquez was only 19th after an early crash chasing his brother.

A late flurry of time attack laps on fresh soft rubber at the end of the 45-minute session led to a total shake-up of the order, with Miller prevailing by 0.273 seconds as just 1.273s covered the top 21 of 22 riders.

KTM’s Miguel Oliveira set the early benchmark pace with a 1m50.039s, which he soon improved to a 1m48.623s just over five minutes into the session.

Marquez did briefly hold top spot with a 1m48.951s, but had this lap scrubbed for exceeding track limits.

Just moments later, the Honda rider’s session came to an abrupt pause when he crashed at the penultimate corner when he was forced to run slightly wide to avoid colliding with his brother Alex Marquez.

The elder Marquez brother wrecked his RC213V and was visibly furious with the crash, but would soon be back out on circuit on his second Honda.

While this was happening Francesco Bagnaia had guided his factory team Ducati to a 1m48.616s, but he too would crash soon after over at the tight Turn 5 left-hander.

While Bagnaia was picking his bike up off the deck, LCR’s Takaaki Nakagami and poleman from last year’s Teruel GP at Aragon shot to the top of the order with a 1m48.574s.

With just under four minutes remaining, the top of the timesheets came under attack as fastest splits started appearing for a number of riders.

Tech 3’s Iker Lecuona edged ahead of Nakagami’s time with a 1m48.536s, before Miller set the best lap of the day with a 1m47.613s.

The Ducati rider would go unchallenged at the top of the order, with Aprilia’s Aleix Espargaro his nearest challenger in second with a 1m47.886s.

 

Yamaha stand-in Cal Crutchlow was an impressive third and top M1 runner with a 1m47.897s – a lap the Briton celebrated emphatically.

Johann Zarco leaped up to fourth late on ahead of Pramac Ducati teammate Jorge Martin, while Bagnaia was sixth after his earlier tumble.

Fabio Quartararo was seventh on the second factory Yamaha having appeared to have received an insect sting underneath his crash helmet.

The top 10 was completed by Nakagami, Enea Bastianini on the Avintia Ducati and Silverstone poleman Pol Espargaro on the factory Honda.

Aleix Rins was the top Suzuki rider in 11th, though currently neither of the GSX-RRs feature in the provisional Q2 places at the end of Friday after teammate Mir was stranded down in 21st.

He trailed Marc Marquez, whose FP1 pacesetting lap keeps him eighth overall, with Maverick Vinales just 1.1s off the pace in 19th as he continues to adapt to the Aprilia.

He shadowed Petronas SRT’s Valentino Rossi, with teammate Jake Dixon 2.3s off the pace in last on the two-year-old Yamaha.

Lecuona found himself shuffled back to 16th in the end ahead of Oliveira, with Luca Marini on the Avintia Ducati slotting in ahead in 15th behind Danilo Petrucci (Tech 3), Alex Marquez and Brad Binder (KTM).

FP2 results:

Cla Rider Bike Time Gap
1 Australia Jack Miller Ducati 1'47.613  
2 Spain Aleix Espargaro Aprilia 1'47.886 0.273
3 United Kingdom Cal Crutchlow Yamaha 1'47.897 0.284
4 France Johann Zarco Ducati 1'47.988 0.375
5 Spain Jorge Martin Ducati 1'48.023 0.410
6 Italy Francesco Bagnaia Ducati 1'48.032 0.419
7 France Fabio Quartararo Yamaha 1'48.034 0.421
8 Japan Takaaki Nakagami Honda 1'48.057 0.444
9 Italy Enea Bastianini Ducati 1'48.086 0.473
10 Spain Pol Espargaro Honda 1'48.166 0.553
11 Spain Alex Rins Suzuki 1'48.267 0.654
12 South Africa Brad Binder KTM 1'48.278 0.665
13 Spain Alex Marquez Honda 1'48.314 0.701
14 Italy Danilo Petrucci KTM 1'48.351 0.738
15 Italy Luca Marini Ducati 1'48.456 0.843
16 Spain Iker Lecuona KTM 1'48.526 0.913
17 Portugal Miguel Oliveira KTM 1'48.623 1.010
18 Italy Valentino Rossi Yamaha 1'48.649 1.036
19 Spain Maverick Viñales Aprilia 1'48.755 1.142
20 Spain Marc Marquez Honda 1'48.827 1.214
21 Spain Joan Mir Suzuki 1'48.886 1.273
22 United Kingdom Jake Dixon Yamaha 1'49.987 2.374
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