FIA further clamps down on F1 engine tricks

The FIA has moved to further clamp down on engine tricks in Formula 1, as teams begin gearing up for the resumption of racing.

FIA further clamps down on F1 engine tricks

Amid a renewed focus on engine behaviour in the wake of the controversy over Ferrari's power unit last season, motor racing's governing body has moved to close down potential grey areas in the rules that teams could be exploiting.

Motorsport.com understands that the FIA's attention with the latest clarifications is on two specific areas: oil burning and ERS power sensors.

On the oil burning front, teams were already facing tougher rules for 2020 as part of a push by the FIA to stop teams using oil as fuel. They were to be restricted to an oil consumption limit of 0.3 litres per 100 kilometres of running.

Now in a move to ensure that teams are not finding ways to get around that limit, the FIA is reserving the right to introduce strict controls on how the oil is measured and the systems sealed prior to cars running on track. There are also fresh procedures to prevent teams using oil chemicals to act as a fuel additive.

On the energy recovery front, the FIA is ramping up efforts to monitor electrical power distribution of the energy recovered by the ERS through an updated sensor that will be fitted to the leading cars at the start of the season.

There had been suspicions in recent years that teams had found ways to cleverly get around limits laid out in the amount of power that can be used to help boost their performance.

While Ferrari has been the main focus of engine intrigue since the private deal it reached with the FIA last year over its 2019 power unit, it is understood that the latest tweaks are not aimed at the Italian manufacturer.

In fact, the extra checks come on the back of what has been hailed by the FIA as a fresh level of co-operation between the governing body and Ferrari in helping better police engines since last year's affair.

In a statement issued when the private settlement between the FIA and Ferrari was reached, it said: "The FIA and Scuderia Ferrari have agreed to a number of technical commitments that will improve the monitoring of all Formula 1 power units for forthcoming championship seasons."

The FIA has also sent out a technical directive clarifying details on fuel-flow meter readings in the mid-range of the engine to ensure teams are fully complying with any limitations.

Furthermore, a note has been sent out regarding powerunit pressure and temperature sensors.

Read Also:

shares
comments
Race of my Life: Jackie Stewart on the 1973 Italian GP

Previous article

Race of my Life: Jackie Stewart on the 1973 Italian GP

Next article

Why F1 is in good hands in its hour of need

Why F1 is in good hands in its hour of need
Load comments
Why momentum is again behind Australia's aces Prime

Why momentum is again behind Australia's aces

At the Italian Grand Prix Daniel Ricciardo turned around a troubled F1 season and, in F2, Oscar Piastri demonstrated once again that he is a potential star of the future. BEN EDWARDS weighs up the prospects of F1 having two Australian stars

The tough balancing act facing Schumacher’s Netflix film producers Prime

The tough balancing act facing Schumacher’s Netflix film producers

Michael Schumacher is the latest sporting superstar to get the ‘Netflix treatment’, with a special documentary film airing on the US streaming giant’s platform this month. DAMIEN SMITH has the inside track on how the filmmakers gained access to tell the human story behind one of Formula 1’s most publicity-shy champions - while the man himself, for obvious reasons, is in absentia… 

Formula 1
Sep 25, 2021
Why Verstappen should be confident of Russian GP recovery Prime

Why Verstappen should be confident of Russian GP recovery

For the second race in a row, Mercedes has ended the first day of track action on top. It’s in a commanding position at the Russian Grand Prix once again – this time largely thanks to Max Verstappen’s upcoming engine-change grid penalty. But there’s plenty to suggest all hope is not lost for the championship leader at Sochi...

Formula 1
Sep 24, 2021
Why dumping the MGU-H is the right move for F1 Prime

Why dumping the MGU-H is the right move for F1

OPINION: With its days apparently numbered, the MGU-H looks set to be dropped from Formula 1’s future engine rules in order to entice new manufacturers in. While it may appear a change of direction, the benefits for teams and fans could make the decision a worthwhile call

Formula 1
Sep 23, 2021
The floundering fortunes of F1’s many Lotus reboots Prime

The floundering fortunes of F1’s many Lotus reboots

Team Lotus ceased to exist in 1994 - and yet various parties have been trying to resurrect the hallowed name, in increasingly unrecognisable forms, ever since. Damien Smith brings GP Racing’s history of the legendary team to an end with a look at those who sought to keep the flame alive in Formula 1.

Formula 1
Sep 22, 2021
Why the 2021 title fight is far from F1's worst, despite its toxic background Prime

Why the 2021 title fight is far from F1's worst, despite its toxic background

OPINION: Formula 1 reconvenes for the Russian Grand Prix two weeks after the latest blow in ‘Max Verstappen vs Lewis Hamilton’. While the Silverstone and Monza incidents were controversial, they thankfully lacked one element that so far separates the 2021 title fight from the worst examples of ugly championship battles

Formula 1
Sep 22, 2021
How Mika Hakkinen thrived at Lotus Prime

How Mika Hakkinen thrived at Lotus

Mika Hakkinen became Michael Schumacher’s biggest rival in Formula 1 in the late-90s and early 2000s, having also made his F1 debut in 1991. But as MARK GALLAGHER recalls, while Schumacher wowed the world with a car that was eminently capable, Hakkinen was fighting to make his mark with a famous team in terminal decline

Formula 1
Sep 21, 2021
The forgotten F1 comeback that began Jordan’s odyssey  Prime

The forgotten F1 comeback that began Jordan’s odyssey 

Before Michael Schumacher – or anyone else – had driven the 191 (or 911 as it was initially called), Eddie Jordan turned to a fellow Irishman to test his new Formula 1 car. JOHN WATSON, a grand prix winner for Penske and McLaren, recalls his role in the birth of a legend…

Formula 1
Sep 20, 2021