Ferrari: Top F1 teams will still dominate in 2021

Ferrari believes that Formula 1's top teams will still be clear of the opposition in 2021, despite a radical overhaul of the rules aimed at making the sport more exciting.

Ferrari: Top F1 teams will still dominate in 2021

A major revamp of the regulations, including new finance rules and cars that should be better for racing, has been agreed with the hope of making things more unpredictable.

But although a future budget cap and a fairer share of revenues may have an impact on long-term performance, Ferrari team principal Mattia Binotto thinks for 2021 at least there will not be such a radical shake-up of the order.

"I believe that the top teams will initially get a benefit in terms of performance because of the amount of resources we have got to develop a new car," he said.

"Later on, hopefully the small teams may make a jump, but the discontinuity [of the rules], it is quite a challenge. It is very difficult to understand today how it may be.

"I think the top teams will remain the top teams. We have still the best teams. We have still the best know-how. We have the resources and the budgets, so I am pretty sure that will not change much."

Red Bull boss Christian Horner shares Binotto's view that new rules are often a help to the bigger teams, who can throw more resource at changes.

"It always takes time for things to concertina," he said. "We are only just starting to see that now with chassis and power units and so on, and that is after a period of pretty much four-to-five years.

"So there is an argument to say that those teams with more resource will benefit from that as they go into 2021.

"And inevitably when there is a big regulation change, somebody gets it right and others undershoot. You want to make sure that you are on top of the curve rather than behind it."

Read Also:

The level of the budget cap, set at $175 million with numerous areas outside its remit including marketing and driver salaries, means that only the top teams will have to trim back on expenditure from 2021.

And with even a major manufacturer like Renault expecting to have to spend more to hit the limit, the chances of a truly level playing field appear unlikely.

Renault F1 team boss Cyril Abiteboul thinks the spending gap between the big three and the rest will only be trimmed by around half its current level.

"If you talk about the budget cap, it is going to take years to have any implication to what we see on track," Abiteboul told Motorsport.com.

"For me it was so important to get the budget cap agreed but also to have some restrictions on the development: more restrictive regulations, aero, standard parts, proscriptive parts and design. All of those are coming as safeguards to accelerate the effect of the budget cap.

"I have to say that not everything has been delivered in that respect, and I still believe in my opinion that 50% of the gap will be reduced. I have no figures to provide evidence to back up what I am saying, but it is my gut feeling.

"I believe we will do a step in 2021 and then for 2022 and 2023 onwards, the budget cap will do another step. We need to accept that change in F1 takes time."

 

shares
comments
Vettel: F1 would be "stupid" to ignore issues like environment

Previous article

Vettel: F1 would be "stupid" to ignore issues like environment

Next article

Massa and Fittipaldis star at Ayrton Senna festival in Sao Paulo

Massa and Fittipaldis star at Ayrton Senna festival in Sao Paulo
Load comments
Why Mercedes is pleased to be in the Hungary hunt at a 'Red Bull track' Prime

Why Mercedes is pleased to be in the Hungary hunt at a 'Red Bull track'

Mercedes ended Friday practice at the Hungaroring with a clear gap to Red Bull thanks to Valtteri Bottas’s pace in topping FP2. But there are other reasons why the Black Arrows squad feels satisfied with its progress so far at a track many Formula 1 observers reckon favours Red Bull overall...

How Red Bull endured its second car crash in two weeks Prime

How Red Bull endured its second car crash in two weeks

OPINION: Red Bull was justified to be upset that Lewis Hamilton survived his British GP clash with Max Verstappen and went on to win. But its attempts to lobby the FIA to reconsider the severity of Hamilton's in-race penalty were always likely to backfire, and have only succeeded in creating a PR disaster that will distract from its on-track efforts

The ‘screaming’ F1 engine future that may not be out of reach Prime

The ‘screaming’ F1 engine future that may not be out of reach

OPINION: It wasn't just the Verstappen/Hamilton clash that had the Red Bull and Mercedes bosses at loggerheads at Silverstone, with the nature of Formula 1's 2025 engines also subject for disagreement. But hopes to have loud, emotive engines that are also environmentally friendly don't have to be opposed.

Formula 1
Jul 29, 2021
How Lotus uncovered, then squandered its last ‘unfair advantage’ Prime

How Lotus uncovered, then squandered its last ‘unfair advantage’

Cast in the mould of its founder Colin Chapman, Lotus was powerful and daring but flawed – as it proved through further soaring peaks and painful troughs into the 1980s. DAMIEN SMITH examines a game-changing era

Formula 1
Jul 27, 2021
The core problems Yas Marina’s long-awaited tweaks won't address Prime

The core problems Yas Marina’s long-awaited tweaks won't address

OPINION: Changes to the layout of Abu Dhabi’s circuit aim to reverse the trend of insipid Formula 1 races there - the promoter has even described one of the new corners as “iconic”. And that, argues STUART CODLING, is one of this venue’s abiding failings

Formula 1
Jul 26, 2021
How Ferrari offered Callum Ilott what Red Bull couldn't Prime

How Ferrari offered Callum Ilott what Red Bull couldn't

Last year's Formula 2 runner-up Callum Ilott could be on his way to becoming the first Briton to contest a grand prix in an Alfa Romeo since Reg Parnell in 1950. But, says Oleg Karpov, the Ferrari Driver Academy protege is having to temper his ambition at the moment – outwardly at least…

Formula 1
Jul 25, 2021
The signs that point to F1's rude health Prime

The signs that point to F1's rude health

OPINION: Formula 1's calendar might still be facing disruption as the pandemic affects travel but, says Mark Gallagher, the business itself is fundamentally strong thanks to the epic rivalry taking place on track and the consistent arrival of new sponsors.

Formula 1
Jul 24, 2021
The unexpected benefit of F1's sprint race repeat Prime

The unexpected benefit of F1's sprint race repeat

OPINION: Formula 1's sprint race trial at Silverstone drew mixed feedback on Saturday, but there remained the true test of how it would impact Sunday's Grand Prix. While fans were busy marvelling at Fernando Alonso's progress, a key lesson was being learned that would directly contribute to the dramatic lap-one clash at Copse the following day

Formula 1
Jul 22, 2021