Protect us from ourselves on spending, F1 teams tell Carey

F1 chief Chase Carey says that top teams have told the sport's new owners that they want to be "protected them from themselves" and prevented from spending excessive amounts of money.

Protect us from ourselves on spending, F1 teams tell Carey
Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari SF70H, Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes AMG F1 W08, Valtteri Bottas, Mercedes AMG F1 W08, Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB13, the rest of the field at the start, as Kimi Raikkonen, Ferrari SF70H, Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB13, get caught up in an incident
Chase Carey, Chairman, Formula One,
Romain Grosjean, Haas F1 Team VF-17, Fernando Alonso, McLaren MCL32, Pascal Wehrlein, Sauber C36, Lance Stroll, Williams FW40
Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari SF70H, Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes AMG F1 W08, Valtteri Bottas, Mercedes AMG F1 W08, Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB13, the rest of the field at the start, as Kimi Raikkonen, Ferrari SF70H, Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB13, get caught up in an incident
Chase Carey, Chief Executive Officer and Executive Chairman of the Formula One Group
Felipe Massa, Williams FW40, Fernando Alonso, McLaren MCL32, Esteban Ocon, Sahara Force India F1 VJM10, Sergio Perez, Sahara Force India F1 VJM10 at the start
Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari SF70H, Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes AMG F1 W08
Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari SF70H leads at the start of the race as Kimi Raikkonen, Ferrari SF70H and Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB13 collide
Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes AMG F1 W08, Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari SF70H, the field away at the start
Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari SF70H, Fernando Alonso, McLaren MCL32, Sergio Perez, Sahara Force India F1 VJM10
Pascal Wehrlein, Sauber C36
Romain Grosjean, Haas F1 Team VF-17, Fernando Alonso, McLaren MCL32, Pascal Wehrlein, Sauber C36, Lance Stroll, Williams FW40
Pascal Wehrlein, Sauber C36, Lance Stroll, Williams FW40

The F1 CEO says that the big players are spending so much purely because they have to match their rivals, and that the only way to slow it down is to tune the rules to reduce costs and stop unnecessary expenditure.

Carey and F1 sporting chief Ross Brawn see the post-2020 power unit regulations as the key to cutting expense.

In a recent meeting with the FIA and the four manufacturers – with Alfa Romeo and VW/Audi also represented – the basic format was agreed.

"We came out of a meeting a few weeks ago on the engines to sort of say we think we'd like the engine to be simpler, cheaper, louder," said Carey.

"This last generation became more expensive and complex, which is what enabled for a period Mercedes to build a better engine than everybody else.

"We want technology and engineering to be part of the sport, but it shouldn't be a defining part of the sport. You should get an edge, but first and foremost we still want the drivers to be the stars.

"What some of the teams spend on the sport today is an incredible amount, and they'll acknowledge it's an incredible amount. To some degree they're saying, 'We need to be protected from ourselves.'

"There are a handful teams that spend an extraordinary amount that aren't really spending to create something that enhances the consumer experience. What they're doing is spending because two other guys are spending it, so they've got to do it to compete with the other guys.

"And we want this to be healthier for all the teams, we'd like to be a healthy business for them. If we can manage the spending, the engine becomes part of that."

Simpler rules

Carey is adamant that technology plays too big a role at the moment, although he understands that it has always been part of the sport.

"On the track we'll do everything we can to make sure we're enhancing, making the competition great, making the action great, improving passing and other things.

"Let's not get too complicated, so fans can follow it. One of the things we keep saying to them is at the end of the day we're doing it for the fans, we're not doing it for the teams.

"We want first and foremost a simpler sport, sports entertainment, so you've got to make the entertainment great, and then enable fans to connect to it.

"The R&D part is an important part, again we don't want to lose the engineering aspects of it, but it shouldn't dominate it. Niki Lauda keeps saying to me we've got to let the drivers drive."

The real significance of controlling costs to Carey and his colleagues is that there is a bigger picture related to a revised distribution of income amongst the teams, once the current Concorde Agreement expires in 2020.

He has made it clear that reducing what teams have to spend will help to justify a cut in what they are paid.

"Costs and revenues are all inter related. You have to deal with it in pieces, but you want to start with a focus on the whole.

"So it's costs, revenue, rules, engines, which is why our real focus is that we want to make for everybody the business of owning a team a much better business proposition for everybody.

"There are certainly benefits for some of the teams in marketing, branding and other benefits that come out of it, but we think it's good for everybody, including us, to make the economics of owning a team much healthier. We're addressing that more holistically at this point."

He remains confident that the teams will fall into line, although he admits that agreeing on he details won't be easy.

"There is a real positive feeling amongst the teams, broad based. I'm sure as we get into specifics of how we execute it, things will be different. And that's our job, to find the common ground in the specific areas.

"But I think the teams are excited about the future, excited about trying to have a long-term vision for the sport, and excited about drafting some of the issues."

shares
comments
Verstappen breaks lap record at Zandvoort during F1 demo

Previous article

Verstappen breaks lap record at Zandvoort during F1 demo

Next article

Pirelli planning softer F1 tyres for 2018

Pirelli planning softer F1 tyres for 2018
Load comments
Why unseen Hungary heroics could be Latifi's making Prime

Why unseen Hungary heroics could be Latifi's making

The chaotic start to the Hungarian GP set the scene for F1's less heralded drivers to make a name for themselves. Esteban Ocon did just that to win in fine style, but further down the order one driver was making his first visit to the points and - while the circumstances were fortunate - took full advantage of the chance presented to him

Hungarian Grand Prix driver ratings Prime

Hungarian Grand Prix driver ratings

This was race that showcased the best and worst of Formula 1, producing a first time winner and a memorable comeback to a podium finish. Avoiding trouble at the start and astute strategy calls were key to success, but where some drivers took full advantage, others made key errors that cost them dearly

Formula 1
Aug 2, 2021
The "heart-breaking" call that led to Ocon's Hungarian GP triumph Prime

The "heart-breaking" call that led to Ocon's Hungarian GP triumph

Set to restart the red-flagged Hungarian Grand Prix in second, Esteban Ocon had some doubts when he peeled into the pits to swap his intermediate tyres for slicks. But this "heart-breaking" call was vindicated in spectacular fashion as the Alpine driver staved off race-long pressure from Sebastian Vettel for a memorable maiden Formula 1 victory

Formula 1
Aug 2, 2021
The F1 champion who became an Indy king in his second career Prime

The F1 champion who became an Indy king in his second career

Emerson Fittipaldi’s decision to go racing with his brother led to him falling out of F1, but he bloomed again on the IndyCar scene. NIGEL ROEBUCK considers a career of two halves

Formula 1
Jul 31, 2021
Why Mercedes is pleased to be in the Hungary hunt at a 'Red Bull track' Prime

Why Mercedes is pleased to be in the Hungary hunt at a 'Red Bull track'

Mercedes ended Friday practice at the Hungaroring with a clear gap to Red Bull thanks to Valtteri Bottas’s pace in topping FP2. But there are other reasons why the Black Arrows squad feels satisfied with its progress so far at a track many Formula 1 observers reckon favours Red Bull overall...

Formula 1
Jul 30, 2021
How Red Bull endured its second car crash in two weeks Prime

How Red Bull endured its second car crash in two weeks

OPINION: Red Bull was justified to be upset that Lewis Hamilton survived his British GP clash with Max Verstappen and went on to win. But its attempts to lobby the FIA to reconsider the severity of Hamilton's in-race penalty were always likely to backfire, and have only succeeded in creating a PR disaster that will distract from its on-track efforts

Formula 1
Jul 30, 2021
The ‘screaming’ F1 engine future that may not be out of reach Prime

The ‘screaming’ F1 engine future that may not be out of reach

OPINION: It wasn't just the Verstappen/Hamilton clash that had the Red Bull and Mercedes bosses at loggerheads at Silverstone, with the nature of Formula 1's 2025 engines also subject for disagreement. But hopes to have loud, emotive engines that are also environmentally friendly don't have to be opposed.

Formula 1
Jul 29, 2021
How Lotus uncovered, then squandered its last ‘unfair advantage’ Prime

How Lotus uncovered, then squandered its last ‘unfair advantage’

Cast in the mould of its founder Colin Chapman, Lotus was powerful and daring but flawed – as it proved through further soaring peaks and painful troughs into the 1980s. DAMIEN SMITH examines a game-changing era

Formula 1
Jul 27, 2021