Belgian GP: Verstappen tops FP2 from Ricciardo

Max Verstappen led Daniel Ricciardo at the head of the times in second practice for Formula 1's 2020 Belgian Grand Prix, with Lewis Hamilton down in third for Mercedes.

Belgian GP: Verstappen tops FP2 from Ricciardo

After rain had fallen during the Formula 3 qualifying session shortly before F1's second practice got underway at Spa, the 90 minutes took place in dry conditions.

The damp track early in the session meant it was a while before any running took place, but by the end of the session Verstappen led the way, with neither Mercedes troubling the top of the times in the first and third sectors, suggesting their power units were turned down.

Ricciardo's high-profile session ended early when he lost hydraulic pressure running onto the Kemmel straight late on and was told to stop his Renault on track.

It took 15 minutes until a timed lap was posted, when Antonio Giovinazzi – who missed most of FP1 with a technical issue – and his teammate Kimi Raikkonen the took turns at the top of the order on medium and hard tyres respectively with a 1m49.716s and 1m46.402s.

Esteban Ocon and Alex Albon then lowered the benchmark on the medium rubber before Valtteri Bottas took P1 for Mercedes with a 1m44.658s – also on the yellow-walled rubber.

While Hamilton conducted his early running on the hards, Verstappen used his mediums to take first place for the first time in the session just before the opening 30 minutes had been completed with a 1m44.354s.

Hamilton then took second on his second flying effort on those hards to sit 0.2s behind the Red Bull before a long mid-session lull took place.

When the cars reappeared, they did so on the softs for their qualifying simulation runs.

Bottas shot back to the top spot with a 1m44.134s, but just a few moments later he was deposed by his teammate as Hamilton popped in a 1m43.840s.

Alex Albon and Sergio Perez then split the Mercedes cars, while Ricciardo unexpectedly took the top spot with a 1m43.792s, with the fastest time in the middle sector (Ocon ended the session with the fastest time in the opening sector in the other Renault).

Just behind Ricciardo, Verstappen was on course to move up the order with a new personal best time on the softs, but he improved so much – particularly at the very end of the lap – that he moved in first place with a 1m43.744s despite not topping an individual sector.

Hamilton, who had a massive slide exiting the pits in the final third of the session as he appeared to be changing a switch on his steering wheel and nearly lost the rear of his W11, was therefore shuffled down to third ahead of Albon, Perez and Bottas, but did finish with the quickest time in the long middle sector.

The rest of the session was dedicated to long-run data-gathering as usual, but this was twice interrupted.

First Ricciardo's car had to be pushed behind the barriers under the virtual safety car after he lost drive with just over 15 minutes of the session remaining.

The session was then red flagged when an advertising board placed on the run down the endurance pits straight fell onto the circuit – close to where F2 driver Giuliano Alesi had speared into the barriers at the start of the practice session for the support category, which was subsequently stopped.

That led to a final nine-minute run to the flag so the teams could finish their long-run work.

Lando Norris, who had to tour slowly back to the pits in the early laps due to an engine calibration problem, ended up seventh ahead of Ocon, Carlos Sainz and Pierre Gasly.

Lance Stroll wound up just outside the top 10 in P11, with Daniil Kvyat and the two Alfas – led by Giovinazzi – in 13th and 14th.

Last year's Belgian GP winner Charles Leclerc finished down in 15th for Ferrari, with George Russell putting his Williams ahead of Sebastian Vettel, as the Scuderia's power struggles appeared to be even more brutally exposed in Spa's lengthy accelerating zones.

The Haas drivers took P19 and P20 – with Romain Grosjean ahead of Kevin Magnussen – each with only 12 laps on the board as they again missed running while the team changed their customer Ferrari power units.

After they failed to set a time in FP1, Magnussen missed almost all of the opening hour of FP2, while Grosjean only appeared for the first time with under 30 minutes remaining.

Cla Driver Chassis Laps Time Gap
1 Netherlands Max Verstappen Red Bull 21 1'43.744  
2 Australia Daniel Ricciardo Renault 12 1'43.792 0.048
3 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 23 1'43.840 0.096
4 Thailand Alex Albon Red Bull 21 1'44.134 0.390
5 Mexico Sergio Perez Racing Point 23 1'44.137 0.393
6 Finland Valtteri Bottas Mercedes 27 1'44.162 0.418
7 United Kingdom Lando Norris McLaren 22 1'44.168 0.424
8 France Esteban Ocon Renault 23 1'44.208 0.464
9 Spain Carlos Sainz Jr. McLaren 23 1'44.474 0.730
10 France Pierre Gasly AlphaTauri 27 1'44.600 0.856
11 Canada Lance Stroll Racing Point 23 1'44.678 0.934
12 Russian Federation Daniil Kvyat AlphaTauri 26 1'44.826 1.082
13 Italy Antonio Giovinazzi Alfa Romeo 29 1'44.861 1.117
14 Finland Kimi Raikkonen Alfa Romeo 23 1'44.896 1.152
15 Monaco Charles Leclerc Ferrari 19 1'45.440 1.696
16 United Kingdom George Russell Williams 25 1'45.463 1.719
17 Germany Sebastian Vettel Ferrari 21 1'45.683 1.939
18 Canada Nicholas Latifi Williams 26 1'45.774 2.030
19 France Romain Grosjean Haas 12 1'45.834 2.090
20 Denmark Kevin Magnussen Haas 12 1'46.242 2.498
shares
comments

Related video

McLaren goes experimental to get 2021 F1 head start

Previous article

McLaren goes experimental to get 2021 F1 head start

Next article

2020 F1 Belgian Grand Prix practice results

2020 F1 Belgian Grand Prix practice results
Load comments
Why dumping the MGU-H is the right move for F1 Prime

Why dumping the MGU-H is the right move for F1

OPINION: With its days apparently numbered, the MGU-H looks set to be dropped from Formula 1’s future engine rules in order to entice new manufacturers in. While it may appear a change of direction, the benefits for teams and fans could make the decision a worthwhile call

The floundering fortunes of F1’s many Lotus reboots Prime

The floundering fortunes of F1’s many Lotus reboots

Team Lotus ceased to exist in 1994 - and yet various parties have been trying to resurrect the hallowed name, in increasingly unrecognisable forms, ever since. Damien Smith brings GP Racing’s history of the legendary team to an end with a look at those who sought to keep the flame alive in Formula 1.

Why the 2021 title fight is far from F1's worst, despite its toxic background Prime

Why the 2021 title fight is far from F1's worst, despite its toxic background

OPINION: Formula 1 reconvenes for the Russian Grand Prix two weeks after the latest blow in ‘Max Verstappen vs Lewis Hamilton’. While the Silverstone and Monza incidents were controversial, they thankfully lacked one element that so far separates the 2021 title fight from the worst examples of ugly championship battles

How Mika Hakkinen thrived at Lotus Prime

How Mika Hakkinen thrived at Lotus

Mika Hakkinen became Michael Schumacher’s biggest rival in Formula 1 in the late-90s and early 2000s, having also made his F1 debut in 1991. But as MARK GALLAGHER recalls, while Schumacher wowed the world with a car that was eminently capable, Hakkinen was fighting to make his mark with a famous team in terminal decline

Formula 1
Sep 21, 2021
The forgotten F1 comeback that began Jordan’s odyssey  Prime

The forgotten F1 comeback that began Jordan’s odyssey 

Before Michael Schumacher – or anyone else – had driven the 191 (or 911 as it was initially called), Eddie Jordan turned to a fellow Irishman to test his new Formula 1 car. JOHN WATSON, a grand prix winner for Penske and McLaren, recalls his role in the birth of a legend…

Formula 1
Sep 20, 2021
The squandered potential of a 70s F1 underdog Prime

The squandered potential of a 70s F1 underdog

A podium finisher in its first outing but then never again, the BRM P201 was a classic case of an opportunity squandered by disorganisation and complacency, says Stuart Codling.

Formula 1
Sep 18, 2021
The other notable Monza escape that F1 should learn from Prime

The other notable Monza escape that F1 should learn from

OPINION: The headlines were dominated by the Italian Grand Prix clash between Max Verstappen and Lewis Hamilton, who had the halo to thank for avoiding potentially serious injury. But two days earlier, Formula 1 had a lucky escape with a Monza pitlane incident that could also have had grave consequences.

Formula 1
Sep 17, 2021
How Monza only added more questions to F1's sprint race conundrum Prime

How Monza only added more questions to F1's sprint race conundrum

With two sprint races under its belt, Formula 1 must now consider its options for them going forward. While they've helped deliver exciting racing on Sundays, the sprints themselves have been somewhat lacking - creating yet another conundrum for F1 to solve...

Formula 1
Sep 16, 2021