Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis
Topic

Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis

Why Ferrari has gone back to old ideas to move forward

Ferrari has been working hard in recent races trying out a raft of updates in a bid to make the progress it wants with its SF1000.

Why Ferrari has gone back to old ideas to move forward

In order to get the best out of it car though, Ferrari has not only been looking to introduce a stream of new parts. It has also rummaged through some of its old design ideas and reapplied them to this year's car too.

One such idea that has returned in recent races but escaped our gaze until now is a roof panel for the coke bottle trench to form a tunnel.

Ferrari SF1000 detail
Ferrari SF1000 floor detail

It’s a solution that the team has had for the last few seasons but discarded going into 2020. However, it had left behind the trench in the floor, in order that more airflow could make its way through the coke bottle region and under the gearbox, before exiting over the central portion of the diffuser. 

Read Also:

As we can see from the specification used in Russia, a small strap-like appendage remained: perhaps in an attempt to funnel the airflow that might be leaking out at that point.

The retrograde solution, introduced at Portimao, is more substantial and reaches forward to create the sort of tunnel section previously favoured by the Scuderia.

Ferrari SF1000 floor tunnel detail
Ferrari SF71H floor channels

As we can see from the front, the tunnel extends out under the lower wishbone (red arrow) in order to give the airflow flowing into the trench a pathway to follow, rather than being able to spill out over the sides.

Looking back through the design lineage of this section of the car, the trench itself predates even this ruleset, with Ferrari having in mind to use such a solution as far back as 2016 (left inset).

For its next phase of development it obviously saw fit to include the roof panel in order to isolate that flow so that it works with the corresponding diffuser layout.

Taking two steps back to stride forward

Based on these retrogrades, it’s clear to see that the team has taken a large step back in its development programme, with the majority of the changes made to the rear-end of their floor and diffuser for this season now largely dumped. 

It’s also interesting that it decided to make this u-turn at a point when it was investigating the effects of the 2021 regulations too, seeing as the changes are focused largely on the floor, diffuser and rear brake ducts.

Ferrari SF1000 floor detail with 2021 rules

Ferrari SF1000 floor detail with 2021 rules

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

This would suggest that, whilst investigating the 2021 regulations, it discovered that this along with the accompanying retrogrades to its diffuser, floor and other areas of the car, yielded the best development path going forward. 

Three pronged attack

The Scuderia has made a succession of changes to the SF1000 over the last few races, all smaller changes that add up to a much larger package. Here we take a look through them...

Ferrari SF1000 nose inlet detail
Ferrari SF1000 nose inlet detail
1/7

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

At the Russian GP, the team focused on the front of the car, adopting a revised layout for its plough that captures airflow beside the nose tip and delivers it with more accuracy to the aerodynamic surfaces behind it. As we can see, this resulted in the team expanding the opening beside the nose tip.
Ferrari SF1000 front wing Russian GP comparison
Ferrari SF1000 front wing Russian GP comparison
2/7

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari also unveiled a new set of turning vanes at the Russian GP, which featured three rows of vertical vanes mounted on the footplate. These just help to gather up the airflow and repurpose it at a point where it might be becoming turbulent or is in need of redirecting.
Ferrari SF1000 new bargeboard detail
Ferrari SF1000 new bargeboard detail
3/7

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The second phase of its development plan was introduced in Germany for the Eifel GP, with its focus now shifting to the central portion of the car. The tall elements at the front of the bargeboard cluster had their ratio altered, with the forwardmost slot moved further forward [1]. The upper boomerangs surface was also altered to account for other changes beneath it [2], whilst the vertical elements that sit on the outer boundary of the car were altered in order to work more effectively with the L-shaped deflector panels behind them [3 & 4]. The shape of the leading edge of the floor was also changed, along with the strakes mounted on it [5].
Ferrari SF1000 2020 diffuser
Ferrari SF1000 2020 diffuser
4/7

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari introduced a new diffuser at the second round of the championship in Austria, which featured three vertical strakes either side of the central section, rather than the two. The two innermost strakes on either side also featured slots in the lower section
Ferrari SF1000 diffuser detail
Ferrari SF1000 diffuser detail
5/7

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The diffuser fitted to the SF1000 at the first round in Austria is very similar to the specification that Ferrari switched to in Portugal and features just two vertical strakes either side of the central section. The two innermost strakes are now devoid of slots once more.
Ferrari SF1000 floor comparison
Ferrari SF1000 floor comparison
6/7

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Meanwhile, another retrograde made by the Scuderia has been in its treatment of the floor ahead of the rear tyre, with the horizontal flap discarded and replaced by three angled fins - a solution introduced last season and subsequently abandoned.
Ferrari SF1000 floor detail with debris
Ferrari SF1000 floor detail with debris
7/7

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Motorsport Images

Whilst it won’t be the primary reason for its switch to the three fin arrangement, it’s also interesting to see that the horizontal flap had a penchant for collecting discarded rubber which will obviously hinder performance.
shares
comments

Related video

How Russell found himself at the centre of F1's silly season
Previous article

How Russell found himself at the centre of F1's silly season

Next article

Vietnam Grand Prix scrapped for F1 2021 season

Vietnam Grand Prix scrapped for F1 2021 season
Load comments
How getting sacked from Benetton made Mercedes' Allison Prime

How getting sacked from Benetton made Mercedes' Allison

He’s had a hand in world championship-winning Formula 1 cars for Benetton, Renault and Mercedes, and was also a cog in the Schumacher-Ferrari axis. Having recently ‘moved upstairs’ as Mercedes chief technical officer, James Allison tells Stuart Codling about his career path and why being axed by Benetton was one of the best things that ever happened to him.

Formula 1
Nov 28, 2021
The remarkable qualities that propelled Kubica’s F1 comeback Prime

The remarkable qualities that propelled Kubica’s F1 comeback

It’s easy to look at Robert Kubica’s second Formula 1 career and feel a sense of sadness that he didn’t reach the heights for which he seemed destined. But as Ben Anderson discovered, performance and results are almost meaningless in this context – something more fundamental and incredible happened…

Formula 1
Nov 27, 2021
The humbling changes Ricciardo made to deliver for McLaren Prime

The humbling changes Ricciardo made to deliver for McLaren

From being lapped by his own teammate in Monaco to winning at Monza, it’s been a tumultuous first season at McLaren for Daniel Ricciardo. But, as he tells STUART CODLING, there’s more to the story of his turnaround than having a lovely summer holiday during Formula 1's summer break...

Formula 1
Nov 26, 2021
The potential benefits of losing the F1 constructors' title Prime

The potential benefits of losing the F1 constructors' title

As the battle continues to rage over the F1 2021 drivers' championship, teams up and down the grid are turning their attentions to the prize money attributed to each position in the constructors' standings. But F1's sliding scale rules governing wind tunnel and CFD use will soften the blow for those who miss out on the top places

Formula 1
Nov 25, 2021
The invisible enemy that's made Hamilton's title charge tougher Prime

The invisible enemy that's made Hamilton's title charge tougher

After winning his past few Formula 1 titles as a canter, Lewis Hamilton currently trails Max Verstappen by eight points heading into the final double-header of 2021. Although Red Bull has been his biggest on-track challenge, Hamilton feels that he has just as much to grapple with away from the circuit

Formula 1
Nov 24, 2021
Why F1's inconvenient penalties have to stay Prime

Why F1's inconvenient penalties have to stay

OPINION: Quibbles over the length of time taken by Formula 1's stewards over decisions are entirely valid. But however inconvenient it is, there can be no questioning the importance of having clearly defined rules that everyone understands and can stick to. Recent events have shown that ambiguity could have big consequences

Formula 1
Nov 23, 2021
The mistakes Red Bull cannot afford to repeat in F1 2021's title fight climax Prime

The mistakes Red Bull cannot afford to repeat in F1 2021's title fight climax

OPINION: Red Bull has had Formula 1’s fastest package for most of 2021, but in several of the title run-in events it has wasted the RB16B’s potential. It cannot afford to do so again with Lewis Hamilton motoring back towards Max Verstappen in the drivers’ standings with two rounds remaining

Formula 1
Nov 23, 2021
Qatar Grand Prix driver ratings Prime

Qatar Grand Prix driver ratings

Qatar was a virtual unknown for most as Formula 1 made its inaugural visit to the Gulf state, and tyre management quickly emerged as an even more critical factor than normal. Perhaps then it should come as no surprise that two of the championship's elder statesmen produced standout drives

Formula 1
Nov 22, 2021