Ferrari wants "maximum penalties" for F1 cost cap rule breaches

Ferrari has urged the FIA to impose "maximum penalties" on any Formula 1 team that is found to have breached the sport’s cost cap rules.

Ferrari wants "maximum penalties" for F1 cost cap rule breaches
Listen to this article

F1 teams are bracing themselves for an FIA announcement next Wednesday that will confirm which teams were under last year’s circa $145 million limit and which outfits went over.

The paddock at Singapore has been awash with speculation that two teams have been found to have exceeded the cap, amid suggestions one is a minor procedural breach and the other is a bigger material breach.

Fingers have been pointed at Aston Martin and Red Bull, but both teams have moved to play the situation down.

Red Bull team boss Christian Horner told Sky F1 on Friday that at the time of his squad submitting its accounts it was below the cap.

However, subsequent clarifications from the FIA about areas that should and should not be included in the cost cap are understood to be central to suggestions that the squad may have been tipped over.

Late on Friday night, the FIA issued a statement insisting that its assessment of the cost cap situation was ongoing and it was too early to talk about rule breaches.

“The FIA notes significant and unsubstantiated speculation and conjecture in relation to this matter, and reiterates that the assessment is ongoing and due process will be followed without consideration to any external discussion," it said.

But while official confirmation of the situation will not come for a few days, Ferrari has urged the governing body to be especially firm, and totally open, in how it deals with the matter.

Laurent Mekies, Ferrari’s race director, told Sky Italia: “It’s now no secret that two teams broke the 2021 budget cap regulations, one by a significant amount, the other less so.

“We regard this as something very serious and we expect the FIA to manage the situation in exemplary fashion.

“We trust the FIA 100 percent. They have taken a very strong position in recent weeks and months on other issues.

“Therefore we expect that, for such a serious matter, there will be complete transparency and maximum penalties to ensure we are all racing within the same rules, because their impact on car performance is huge.”

Laurent Mekies, Racing Director, Ferrari, in the team principals Press Conference

Laurent Mekies, Racing Director, Ferrari, in the team principals Press Conference

Photo by: FIA Pool

Mekies said that beyond the significance of judgements on the individual case, how the process played out from here was vital in helping teams understand the limits of the cost cap.

“Putting penalties to one side, the important aspect is that the FIA can establish that there has been an overspend,” he said.

“Once that has been done, at least then we have confirmation that these are the rules that everyone must abide by. After that, the subject of penalties can be discussed in light of the effect of the overspend in 2021, in 2022 and what it will be in 2023, because obviously, at the current time and the point in this season in which we find ourselves, there is also an effect on next season.

“But as I mentioned, the most important thing, for which we expect the maximum severity and maximum transparency, is that the overspend is confirmed, as are the rules under which we must all race.”

Should Red Bull be found guilty of a material breach of the rules last year, then there are a range of options open to FIA as sanction – which includes fines, points deducations and goes as far as exclusion from the championship.

But with the end of the 2021 season having already been marred in controversy, it is unthinkable that the FIA would go as far as changing the results of last season’s title chase.

However, Mekies said that while such a move would be hard for many fans to accept, he said of utmost important was that teams fully respected the rules.

Asked about the implications of the breach on last year’s championship, and how it could influence both this year and next season’s campaigns, Mekies said: “We understand that it could be a problem for Formula 1 fans to have to reconsider past results.

“However, it is so very important for us to be sure that the rules are respected and are genuine rules and that if they are broken, then real penalties must be applied. [And] if not retrospectively for past infringements, then at least for the future.” 

Read Also:
shares
comments

Related video

F1 Singapore Grand Prix qualifying – Start time, how to watch, channel
Previous article

F1 Singapore Grand Prix qualifying – Start time, how to watch, channel

Next article

Why Red Bull and Ferrari are eying key set-up changes for Singapore GP

Why Red Bull and Ferrari are eying key set-up changes for Singapore GP
Why Mercedes believes it can make the step F1 needs to fight Red Bull Prime

Why Mercedes believes it can make the step F1 needs to fight Red Bull

The 2022 Formula 1 season was Mercedes' leanest for a decade, achieving just a solitary pole and grand prix win. Yet the team is confident it has got the tools it needs to cast that disappointment aside and return to the front of the field again next year.

How BRM's one-off F1 double defied its rollercoaster history Prime

How BRM's one-off F1 double defied its rollercoaster history

It’s 60 years since BRM achieved its goal and Graham Hill led the team to a world title double. But that was just part of the remarkable story of a unique team that at times overstretched its resources and had its fair share of disappointments.

Formula 1
Dec 8, 2022
The bold F1 DRS experiment that could end the debate forever Prime

The bold F1 DRS experiment that could end the debate forever

OPINION: The effectiveness of DRS in Formula 1 remains a topic of debate as the winter break gives a chance for reflection on the racing we saw in 2022. For all of its detractors, perhaps an experiment where DRS is cast aside and the impact this has on racing is in order to truly understand its merits in modern F1.

Formula 1
Dec 8, 2022
The sliding doors moment that saved Red Bull and Porsche Prime

The sliding doors moment that saved Red Bull and Porsche

OPINION: Everything looked set for Red Bull and Porsche to join forces for the 2026 season, before the marriage between both parties was called off. While at the time it looked like a major coup for Formula 1 in gaining both VW Group powerhouses Audi and Porsche for 2026, Red Bull and Porsche have really been spared a potentially fractious relationship.

Formula 1
Dec 7, 2022
How Tyrrell’s post-Stewart era descended into a fight to survive Prime

How Tyrrell’s post-Stewart era descended into a fight to survive

Glory days for Tyrrell became increasingly infrequent
 after Jackie Stewart’s retirement. But in the latest instalment of his history of the team for Autosport's sister title GP Racing, 
MAURICE HAMILTON recalls how Ken Tyrrell’s plucky and defiantly small team stayed bold enough to innovate – springing a surprise with F1’s first six-wheeled car

Formula 1
Dec 6, 2022
How departing F1 boss Brawn views F1’s new rules - and the future Prime

How departing F1 boss Brawn views F1’s new rules - and the future

Multiple-title-winning designer and team boss Ross Brawn is finally leaving Formula 1 after nearly 50 years in motorsport. But he still has plenty of insights on what’s working and what comes next, as he revealed to Motorsport.com in a far-reaching exclusive interview in Abu Dhabi.

Formula 1
Dec 2, 2022
The key F1 management call Ferrari must make to avoid more defeat Prime

The key F1 management call Ferrari must make to avoid more defeat

OPINION: Mattia Binotto’s departure from Ferrari will naturally bring a range of changes across the Formula 1 team. But how the changes shape up and the impact they could have is set to be dictated by a key direction Ferrari’s top dogs will need to pick

Formula 1
Nov 30, 2022
The difference between Mercedes’ stumble and the fall of F1 giants Prime

The difference between Mercedes’ stumble and the fall of F1 giants

OPINION: Mercedes endured its worst season of the hybrid Formula 1 era, but was mercifully spared its first winless campaign in over a decade late on. It has owned up to the mistakes it made which led to its troubled W13. And while its task to return to title-challenging contention is not small, its 2022 season seems more like a blip than the beginning of a downward spiral.

Formula 1
Nov 29, 2022