WRC

New Zealand Test of New Saftey Vehicles

RALLY NEW ZEALAND TEST EVENT FOR NEW ACCIDENT RESPONSE INITIATIVE. Smaller, faster and more nimble first intervention vehicles will be used for the first time in world rallying during Rally New Zealand, this country's round of the FIA World...

RALLY NEW ZEALAND TEST EVENT FOR NEW ACCIDENT RESPONSE INITIATIVE.

Smaller, faster and more nimble first intervention vehicles will be used for the first time in world rallying during Rally New Zealand, this country's round of the FIA World Rally Championship, which starts at Manukau City Friday July 24.

In the past the rally has used the larger common white ambulances used by St Johns and similar organizations at every special stage.

"The older and slower vehicles still have a role to play, but we are looking for a faster response to any possible accident and a smaller and faster vehicle fitted with just the essential first aid and life support equipment will reach and stabilize any patient far sooner", said the Clerk of Course, Graeme Robertson.

The FIV (First Intervention Vehicles) fitted with basic medical and life survival equipment and qualified medical people, will be located at the start of every special stage and will respond far quicker than in the past.

"New Zealand's record for safety and medical response is world class but that is no reason to sit back and be complacent", said Robertson. "We intend to investigate every opportunity to improve our performance at any accident scene".

FIV ambulances will continue to be used, positioned at central points to a number of stages and any patient from the rally, either competitor or spectator can be given first aid at the scene and transported for further treatment to medical centers.

The organizers will have a helicopter flying near the rally route and can communicate with ground response units instantly an accident is reported.

"Although this FIV response team has not been fully endorsed by the world governing body of motor sport, we have gained approval for our rally to be used as a test case for future WRC events", he said.

The service is partly aimed at reducing the demand on the number of these services and partly aimed at giving a faster response in the case of a serious accident.

"There is no substitute for the 10's of thousands of spectators to recognize that motor sport can be dangerous, if they stand in the wrong place to watch these cars they are taking an unnecessary risk" he said. "Our officials are trained to recognize the danger points, especially on the outside curve of corners".

Most injuries to spectators occur where a competing car leaves the road on the outside of a corner and therefore spectators should always stand well away from these danger points and always look for a raised piece of ground on the inside not in a position of danger.

Rally New Zealand starts at Manukau City with a super special stage Friday July 24 and finishes at the Ti Papa Equestrian Centre near Clevedon on Monday July 27 after competing in the Maramarua Forest, Maungaturoto region and the rugged coast back country roads of the west Waikato area.

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