Valvoline Racing News (2000-03-13)

NHRA: Hines Begins His 'Roar for 4' If Matt Hines has a theme for the year 2000 in NHRA Winston Pro Stock Motorcycle drag racing, "The Roar for Four" might be it. Hines rode his Eagle One Suzuki to an unprecedented third ...

NHRA: Hines Begins His 'Roar for 4'

If Matt Hines has a theme for the year 2000 in NHRA Winston Pro Stock Motorcycle drag racing, "The Roar for Four" might be it. Hines rode his Eagle One Suzuki to an unprecedented third consecutive bike championship in 1999, taking the title from rival Angelle Seeling in a classic come-from-behind effort in the Pomona finale. The cycle season starts this weekend (March 17-19) with the Mac Tools Gatornationals at Gainesville, Fla. Will motivation be a problem after three crowns? "I don't think it's a problem like we have too much self-confidence," says Hines, 27. "It is a whole different perspective trying to defend a championship than going for one. It's been pretty much business-as-usual for us and I think we just have to stick with our game plan. This year should be a little different because we are starting off with the same Eagle One Suzuki we had last year. We've freshened up three of our four best motors and we're building a new top end for the other. We have more power than in the past and I definitely think some records can be broken." NHRA Extra: Krisher steps Up to Win in Pro Stock

Eagle One Pontiac Firebird owner-driver Ron Krisher has decided now is the time to try to win in the NHRA Winston Pro Stock class. He made several dramatic moves during the off-season, including purchasing his own engine-building company, and hiring Mike Edwards -- seventh in Pro Stock driver points with two victories in 1999 -- as crew chief. After a spectacular flip to open the season at Pomona, Krisher came back three weeks later at Firebird Raceway with a new car, and made the semifinals for the first time. The Warren, Ohio businessman is back in action this weekend at Gainesville. "I'm not getting any younger," explained Krisher, who turned 52 on March 11. "Your reaction time starts to slow down and everything's a little different. I came over here to be competitive, to at least finish in the top 10, and win some races. I decided I've only got a couple of years left -- two-three years, at the most -- that I can possibly do that. I felt I had to get control of the motor program and already I can see what that's worth. We've made tremendous strides over the old program because we're putting money into it and changing things. Every motor that comes out of that shop is better than the last one. We spend whatever money it takes until it is. "There's only a certain time in your life when you're going to be competitive doing this. I decided I'm going to make the commitment. When I'm done with this, I'll have a motor program where I can lease or sell motors and have the respect of the people. "You don't have to tell anybody when you're going faster. They all know it and worry about you. I like going up to the starting line the first round or second round and having the other guy know I can beat him. That's a really good feeling. Just to go out and kick somebody's butt and come back and know you did it. All this work and effort paid off!"

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Series NHRA
Drivers Matt Hines , Ron Krisher , Mike Edwards