Rules Changes Defined for 2000 Season

NATIONAL HOT ROD ASSOCIATION DEFINES RULES CHANGES FOR 2000 RACE SEASON Reaffirms governing body's original announcement to review and refine, as necessary, the new rule changes based on testing sessions GLENDORA, Calif. - In a move designed...

NATIONAL HOT ROD ASSOCIATION DEFINES RULES CHANGES FOR 2000 RACE SEASON

Reaffirms governing body's original announcement to review and refine, as necessary, the new rule changes based on testing sessions

GLENDORA, Calif. - In a move designed to further define the rules handed down by the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) last year, the world's largest motorsports organization specified the penalty system for oildowns, what constitutes an oildown, and allocation of money collected from the fines. In addition, NHRA revised the 90 percent nitromethane rule to incorporate more than one supplier.

"Consistent with our plan to closely monitor the new rules and based on driver feedback, testing results last weekend, and discussions within NHRA, we have refined those rules and provided further definition to their consequences," said Tom Compton, president of NHRA.

It was announced teams that oil down the track during qualifying at NHRA-sanctioned national events and the Winston Showdown will be fined $500, per occurrence. The NHRA announced that no points will be deducted during qualifying rounds. During elimination rounds, teams will be fined $1,000 and lose ten (10) championship points, per occurrence, except at the Winston Showdown where no points will be deducted. Monies collected from the fines will be directed to further research and experimentation with technology to resolve issues related to oildowns, safety and quality of show.

"It goes without saying that all monies raised through these new penalties will be put directly back into the sport to make it better and more exciting for fans, sponsors and participants," said Compton.

A clear definition of what constitutes an oildown was also unveiled. The policy applies to the entire track surface, from where the vehicle enters to where it exits the racetrack. A violation is defined as any incident requiring the use of mechanical equipment (i.e. tractor, trucks, and/or sweeper) to clean up an oil spill. A penalty will not be imposed if the spill or oil drop can be cleaned up by hand or if the vehicle deposits fuel or fire extinguisher liquid. An oil cleanup resulting from a crash will not result in a penalty unless the accident was a result of depositing oil on the track.

NHRA also announced that it will not require nitromethane fuel to be from one supplier. "The original premise of the single supplier and the 90 percent blend was to provide consistency and a mechanism to enforce the 90 percent rule. We concluded that we should put the challenge of meeting the 90 percent rule into the hands of the race teams," said Ray Alley, director of top fuel and funny car racing

Beginning at the AutoZone Winternationals, February 3-6, 2000, the only requirement will be that teams cannot exceed 90 percent nitromethane as measured with NHRA's hydrometer. If teams exceed the 90 percent nitromethane test, the run will be disqualified.

In addition, NHRA will have onsite a portable GC (Gas Chromatograph) to test illegal additives in the fuel. Penalties assessed for violation of this test could range from monetary fines to suspension of competition privileges. NHRA will continue to monitor the new rule changes and consider further action, if warranted.

NHRA reserves the right to take further action against continual and flagrant offenders including, but not limited to, additional fines, disqualification and exclusion from NHRA Winston Drag Racing Series events.

-NHRA-

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