Terry Cook headed to Nashivlle

NASHVILLE, TN (August 9, 2000) - The running of the Federated Auto Parts 250 will mark the last time a major NASCAR touring series race will be run at the famed Nashville Speedway USA. For Craftsman Truck Series driver Terry Cook, pilot of...

NASHVILLE, TN (August 9, 2000) - The running of the Federated Auto Parts 250 will mark the last time a major NASCAR touring series race will be run at the famed Nashville Speedway USA. For Craftsman Truck Series driver Terry Cook, pilot of the #88 Pickup-Truck.com Chevrolet, the track's curtain call will be bittersweet. "It will be sentimental to race there for the last time," said Cook. "I enjoy going to all the new tracks we've added to the schedule, but I also feel bad seeing some of the old ones go by the wayside. I'm going to miss Nashville. It's a fun track to race at. You can really get after it there. I've never had a great finish there, but I still have always enjoyed racing at Nashville. There's a lot of history at that race track and I'm looking forward to a packed house. There should be a lot of fans there. No matter where you sit in the grandstand, you have a good seat. They'll be hanging from the trees." The historic .586-mile track located on the Tennessee State Fairgrounds has played host to a number of great races over the years. According to Cook, the main challenge for race teams at Nashville has never changed . "You have to use a lot of brakes, that the thing that fools most everyone at Nashville because you carry a lot of speed into the corners," Cook stated. "It's a high, high braking track. It surprises you how much brake you use. The banking in the turns fool you because the corners are so tight. You really think you can haul in there and then you have to jump on the binders. In qualifying trim and practice, everyone will run right on the bottom. Twenty laps into the race, you have to move up the race track. To do any passing, you have to drive underneath guys and that takes a good truck with a lot of forward bite. Forward bite and brakes, that's what you need at Nashville." So just what do you have to look out for during a lap at Nashville? "You drive into Turn 1 and you use a lot of brake to get your truck turned," said Cook. "Coming off of Turn 2, there's a tunnel that goes under the track. The tunnel has created a big hump that you hit every lap and it just wants to make your truck jump sideways. You get light in the back pretty quick. Heading into Turn 3, you're standing on the brakes again. Coming off Turn 4, you swing right up to the wall. You're just inches from it all day long. There are walls on the outside and the inside of the track, so if you get in trouble, you're probably going to find the concrete. Because of the bank, the track is self-cleaning. If you get involved in a wreck, you're going to slide right down in front of the rest of the pack. There are no easy wrecks at Nashville." Cook should know. Solidly in the Top-5 late in the 1998 race, Cook wrecked hard after a tangle with Andy Houston, Last year, engine woes saddled the Sylvania, OH driver with a 20th-place finish. "Last year's Nashville race was the first race for our new crew chief, Jerry Cook," said Cook. "We promoted him from his regular shop duties and basically threw him into the fire at Nashville. We blew a motor late in the race and it turned out to not be a great weekend for us." Cook and the rest of the PickupTruck.com crew hope they can turn that around when the Craftsman Truck Series heads for Nashville Speedway USA and the Federated Auto Parts 250 Saturday evening. The event will take the green flag at 8 p.m. Eastern Time and will be telecast live by ESPN. The event will also be broadcast by MRN radio.

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Series NASCAR Truck
Drivers Andy Houston , Terry Cook