Jon Wood used hard work to make series

Wood used hard work, not last name to make NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series Jon Wood comes from one of the most successful families in stock car racing. And today the 20-year-old Wood is driving on the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series for one of the...

Wood used hard work, not last name to make NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series

Jon Wood comes from one of the most successful families in stock car racing. And today the 20-year-old Wood is driving on the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series for one of the biggest names in the sport.

But don't get the idea it was all handed to him on a silver platter. He understands what it's like to make sacrifices to reach a goal.

"I kind of had to seclude myself in high school. I didn't have time for sports. I was doing the racing thing," Wood said Tuesday during a media luncheon in Roanoke for the Advance Auto Parts 250 NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series race, set for April 13 at Martinsville Speedway.

"A lot of the guys were playing football and stuff and getting recognized for that, but I was racing in Alabama and North Carolina and other places. I never went to the prom. I missed my graduation. At the time, it kind of looked like a dumb decision, but now it's starting to pay off."

And it's paying off in a pretty big way for the son of Eddie Wood, co-owner of Wood Brothers Racing, and grandson of Glen Wood, founder of Wood Brothers Racing.

After climbing through the lower rungs of racing -- go-karts, Late Model Stocks, the Hooters Series -- Wood is now behind the wheel of one of Jack Roush's Fords on the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series. The legendary Winston Cup team owner tabbed Wood midway through the 2001 season to drive the truck. And this season he's behind the wheel of the U.S. Navy-sponsored Ford F-150 truck on a permanent basis.

"I'm with a really good team. We have good equipment, good motors, good bodies, good chassis -- good everything," said Wood.

After two events this season, Wood is tied for ninth in the Craftsman Truck Series points standings, and is looking for even better results as he heads to Martinsville for the Advance Auto Parts 250, the circuit's next stop.

Wood ran this event a year ago, but not in a Roush truck. That, he thinks, will make a huge difference this time around.

"The Advance Auto Parts 250 is a prestigious race and I think coming back for the second time with such a good team gives us a huge advantage over last year," said Wood.

Wood lives about 25 miles from Martinsville Speedway in Stuart, VA, the same town where is parents and grandparents have lived all their lives. And that makes Martinsville Speedway someplace special to him.

"Where I grew up has a huge impact on my outlook for the Martinsville race," said Wood. "There will be so many people up in the stands I know -- it's like a hometown crowd. That probably makes a little more pressure."

The NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series competitors will time trial for the Advance Auto Parts 250 at 1:30 p.m. on Friday, April 12 while qualifying for the Virginia 500 is set for 3 p.m. Tickets for qualifying are $15 for adults and children under 12 get in free.

The Craftsman Truck Series racing action begins at 2 p.m. on April 13 when the green flag waves on the Advance Auto Parts 250. Tickets for the Advance Auto 250 are $30 for adults and $5 for children ages 6-12. All seats are unreserved.

Great seats are still available for the Virginia 500 NASCAR Winston Cup race for $40 to $70 each. To purchase tickets call the speedway ticket office toll free at 877-722-3849 or order online at www.martinsvillespeedway.com.

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About this article
Series NASCAR Truck
Drivers Jon Wood
Teams Wood Brothers Racing