Atlanta: Timothy Peters preview

Timothy Peters will make his second NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series start on the ultra fast 1.54 mile quad-oval at Atlanta Motor Speedway this Friday in the John Deere 200. Peters will pilot the No. 4 Dodge Motorsports Dodge Ram prepared by Bobby ...

Timothy Peters will make his second NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series start on the ultra fast 1.54 mile quad-oval at Atlanta Motor Speedway this Friday in the John Deere 200. Peters will pilot the No. 4 Dodge Motorsports Dodge Ram prepared by Bobby Hamilton Racing. Peters is coming off of a 12th place finish at Daytona International Speedway and a 24th place finish in the series second event at California. He currently stands 16th in the NCTS driver's point standings, just 40 points out of the top ten. Peters started 30th and finished 18th, on the lead lap in only previous AMS NCTS start. Crew Chief Kip McCord has elected to use the BHR chassis "Duster" for the John Deere 200. This will be "Duster's" second foray into the NCTS arena. Its maiden voyage was this year at California. It has a new body for Atlanta.

What did you learn from your first start at Atlanta Motor Speedway last fall?"I learned a whole lot the first time out at Atlanta. The biggest thing was that Atlanta is not just a one groove track, it is definitely a multiple groove racetrack. It is fast, wide open and you drive it with the throttle. If we have a good handling truck then we can have a really good run just because of all the grooves you can run there. At Atlanta you can be wide open one lap, halfway out of it the second lap and all the way out of it the third lap and still be pretty quick depending on which line you are using at the time, drafting can help you as well with the speeds we run."

Have you developed a sense for racing on these intermediate tracks like California and Atlanta? "I like every race track we run on. It is in some ways like playing golf. If you get up on the tee box and you bring out a brand new sleeve of balls and you hit all those in the woods, you are not having a good day. It is the same way with racing, if you have a truck that is running 25th every week and you don't know if it is going to go left or right when you go down in the corner then again, you are not having a good day. But if you climb back up on that tee box and you slam one right down the middle of the fairway that is just like running in the top ten or the top five every week. You know you are getting ready to get a win, you know you are having fun then."

Comment on last year about not running every event - did this approach help or hinder growth process? "I think it helped. It got me prepared for a lot of tracks that I am going to go back to this year. There were just a handful of tracks that I didn't race on last year and with the team support that I have behind me with this Dodge Motorsports team I don't think that those tracks will provide any specific problems. It helped me last year to just take a step back at a few races and spot for some of the other drivers. It also helped me a bunch just to watch Bobby Hamilton, what he did in traffic and how he handled certain situations. That has really helped me in terms of how to handle these things when you have a competitive truck. Just the way he can move in and out of traffic and not get himself in trouble and still have a good run. I learned a lot just watching exactly where he ran on the racetrack. Both situations-running races and spotting and observing were big pluses for me and my development.

What have you learned from Bobby Hamilton, both on and off the track, that have helped bridge the big gap between weekly racing and NASCAR's national touring series? "I have learned a lot about this business, how to deal with your obligations to your sponsors, your fans. This is a real family oriented business yet a real serious business in which everything you do has implications. With all the sponsor investments in our sport you have to be aware of your business obligations and your commitment to your team. Bobby teaches you two ways, one is by example and the other is a more hands on approach. He teaches you to be patient on the racetrack, how to watch who you race with, race who you can and don't race the ones you can't or shouldn't race with. He also teaches you how to take care of your equipment so that you can be around when it counts the most, at the end of the race."

-bhr

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Series NASCAR Truck
Drivers Bobby Hamilton , Timothy Peters