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NASCAR Cup Daytona 500
Analysis

The early benefits and challenges of NASCAR's Next Gen car

NASCAR’s new stock car generation is encouraging an influx of fresh blood into its top tier. But there are concerns that parts are in short supply as the entire paddock tries to build up stocks at the same time

NASCAR's revolutionary Next Gen Cup Series car has had something of a baptism of fire, with last Sunday's Daytona 500 on the 190mph high banks a world away from the LA Coliseum's quarter-mile oval where the car made its debut earlier this month.

The new machine's single-supplier, common-component ethos forms the seventh generation of stock car at the premier level since 1948 and comes at a time when cost savings need to be made. These outlier tracks have proved the concept's flexibility; while teams will still assemble multiple cars for use on short tracks, intermediates and superspeedways – NASCAR's punishing 36-round schedule means they need multiple cars in rotation in a logistical puzzle – they simply won't build as many as before.

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