Charlotte II: Dodge teams "keys to success"

Keys for Success: Bank of America 500 at Lowe's Motor Speedway CONCORD, N.C., (Oct. 11, 2008) -- Each race weekend, random Dodge Motorsports crew chiefs, drivers, engine specialists and team members give their insight on the 'keys to success'...

Keys for Success: Bank of America 500 at Lowe's Motor Speedway

CONCORD, N.C., (Oct. 11, 2008) -- Each race weekend, random Dodge Motorsports crew chiefs, drivers, engine specialists and team members give their insight on the 'keys to success' for the upcoming race. This week, the green flag drops on the Bank of America 500 at the 1.5-mile Lowe's Motor Speedway.

Trivia Question (see below) On December 17, 1903, Wilbur Wright flew the 'Wright Flyer' on it's last low-altitude flight over the fields of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. How long would it take the 'Wright Flyer' to complete the Bank of America 500 at Lowe's Motor Speedway on Saturday night? (answer below)

KASEY KAHNE (No. 9 Budweiser Dodge Charger) "Track position at the end of the race and communication during it. Being able to relay what the car is doing to the team every pit stop and making it better is critical."

ELLIOTT SADLER (No. 19 Best Buy Dodge Charger) "Pit strategy and track position late are always key here. Keep an eye on fuel mileage. There are a lot of long runs here at Lowe's and whoever gets good fuel mileage may have an advantage when it comes down to the last few pit stops."

PAT TRYSON (Crew Chief, No. 2 Miller Lite Dodge Charger) "I think pit strategy is going to be key. There will be a lot of strategies in the pits -- four tires, two tires, gas only....the last 200 laps will be interesting. You have to be there at the end of the race to have a shot to win. Everybody will be keeping a close eye on their fuel mileage. Cautions late in the race I'm sure will play a factor."

Answer to trivia question: 50 hours and 53 minutes. Wilbur and Orville Wright, who are generally credited with inventing and building the world's first successful airplane and making the first controlled, powered and sustained heavier-than-air human flight, made their last attempt which traveled 852 feet in 59 seconds. Only 47 hours and 46 minutes slower than the current race record set on Oct. 11, 1999.

Sources: Wikipedia, NASCAR

-credit: dodge motorsports

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Series NASCAR Cup