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Practice report
MotoGP Dutch GP

MotoGP Dutch GP: Bagnaia shades Marquez in first practice

Bagnaia leads future team-mate Marquez as Dutch GP weekend begins

Francesco Bagnaia, Ducati Team

Francesco Bagnaia, Ducati Team

Photo by: Gold and Goose / Motorsport Images

Reigning MotoGP world champion Francesco Bagnaia topped the opening practice for the 2024 Dutch Grand Prix, after Fabio Di Giannantonio had his session-topping lap cancelled.

After a three-week break forced by the postponement of the Kazakhstan GP to September, MotoGP returned to action on Friday morning at the iconic TT Assen venue.

Following weeks of rider market shocks, Di Giannantonio looked like he’d set the pace in the first practice of the weekend as he aims to secure his MotoGP future.

The VR46 Ducati rider was fastest with a 1m32.314s set in the closing seconds, but had that lap deleted for exceeding track limits, dropping him to seventh.

This promoted factory Ducati rider Bagnaia to top spot with a 1m32.401s he posted with just under 20 minutes remaining in the session.

He headed next year's factory Ducati team-mate Marc Marquez by 0.065 seconds, with the Gresini rider’s future announced days after the Italian GP at the start of June.

Raul Fernandez completed the top three for the Trackhouse Racing Aprilia squad, while Fabio Quartararo was fourth as Yamaha brings a new engine to Assen for both the 2021 world champion and his team-mate Alex Rins.

Marquez set the pace early on in the 45-minute session with a 1m34.286s, which was instantly bettered by Bagnaia on a 1m34.225s.

The pair traded top spot once more, with a 1m33.004s from Marquez beaten by a 1m32.820s by Bagnaia – though this was quickly deleted for a track limits violation.

Marquez then posted a 1m32.980s with just over 10 minutes of the session gone, which stood as the reference for a brief time before Fernandez produced a 1m32.962s.

This was quickly bettered by Bagnaia with a 1m32.625s, with the Italian following that up with a 1m32.401s which would ultimately stand as the best time of the session.

With 15s to go on the clock, a soft tyre-shod Di Giannantonio lit up the timing screens and managed a 1m32.314s before it was cancelled.

Marc Marquez, Gresini Racing

Marc Marquez, Gresini Racing

Photo by: Gold and Goose / Motorsport Images

Bagnaia didn’t change tyres during the session, putting 19 laps on his medium rear, while Marquez and Fernandez completing the top three ran fresh medium rubber.

Quartararo fitted a fresh soft rear for his fourth-fastest time, while fresh mediums for the Aprilia duo of Maverick Vinales – who will join KTM next year – and Aleix Espargaro saw them complete the top six.

Di Giannantonio was shuffled down to seventh after losing his best lap time, with Gresini’s Alex Marquez, KTM’s Brad Binder and championship leader Jorge Martin (Pramac) rounding out the top 10.

Martin, like Bagnaia, stayed on the same medium rear tyre he started the session on through to the chequered flag.

Dutch GP - FP1 results:

   
1
 - 
5
   
   
1
 - 
2
   
Cla Rider # Bike Laps Time Interval km/h Speed Trap
1 Italy F. Bagnaia Ducati Team 1 Ducati 19

1'32.401

  176.959  
2 Spain M. Marquez Gresini Racing 93 Ducati 19

+0.065

1'32.466

0.065 176.834  
3 Spain R. Fernández Trackhouse Racing Team 25 Aprilia 17

+0.100

1'32.501

0.035 176.767  
4 France F. Quartararo Yamaha Factory Racing 20 Yamaha 17

+0.193

1'32.594

0.093 176.590  
5 Spain M. Viñales Aprilia Racing Team 12 Aprilia 19

+0.277

1'32.678

0.084 176.430  
6 Spain A. Espargaro Aprilia Racing Team 41 Aprilia 16

+0.287

1'32.688

0.010 176.411  
7 Italy F. Di Giannantonio Team VR46 49 Ducati 18

1'32.314

  177.125  
8 Spain A. Marquez Gresini Racing 73 Ducati 20

+0.246

1'32.647

0.333 176.489  
9 South Africa B. Binder Red Bull KTM Factory Racing 33 KTM 22

+0.462

1'32.863

0.216 176.078  
10 Spain J. Martin Pramac Racing 89 Ducati 21

+0.526

1'32.927

0.064 175.957  
11 Italy M. Bezzecchi Team VR46 72 Ducati 20

+0.578

1'32.979

0.052 175.859  
12 Italy E. Bastianini Ducati Team 23 Ducati 19

+0.628

1'33.029

0.050 175.764  
13 Portugal M. Oliveira Trackhouse Racing Team 88 Aprilia 21

+0.693

1'33.094

0.065 175.641  
14 Spain P. Acosta Tech 3 31 KTM 21

+0.882

1'33.283

0.189 175.285  
15 Italy F. Morbidelli Pramac Racing 21 Ducati 20

+1.002

1'33.403

0.120 175.060  
16 Spain A. Rins Yamaha Factory Racing 42 Yamaha 18

+1.287

1'33.688

0.285 174.528  
17 Australia J. Miller Red Bull KTM Factory Racing 43 KTM 19

+0.860

1'33.261

  175.327  
18 Japan T. Nakagami Team LCR 30 Honda 20

+1.559

1'33.960

0.699 174.022  
19 Italy L. Marini Repsol Honda Team 10 Honda 21

+1.695

1'34.096

0.136 173.771  
20 Spain A. Fernandez Tech 3 37 KTM 17

+1.719

1'34.120

0.024 173.727  
21 France J. Zarco Team LCR 5 Honda 20

+1.835

1'34.236

0.116 173.513  
22 Spain J. Mir Repsol Honda Team 36 Honda 18

+1.843

1'34.244

0.008 173.498  
23 Italy L. Savadori Aprilia Racing Team 32 Aprilia 18

+2.154

1'34.555

0.311 172.927  

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