Why MotoGP’s newest winner got lucky with red flags in Styria

MotoGP Styrian Grand Prix winner Jorge Martin admits the early red flag proved fortuitous for him as he was struggling with his tyres in the original start.

Why MotoGP’s newest winner got lucky with red flags in Styria
Listen to this article

Sunday’s race was stopped on the third lap for a fiery crash involving KTM wildcard Dani Pedrosa and Aprilia’s Lorenzo Savadori – which left the latter with a broken ankle and has ruled him out of next week’s Austrian GP.

Pramac rider Martin had been running in the lead group in the original start but admits he “almost crashed” chasing factory Ducati counterpart Francesco Bagnaia.

Struggling with his hard front/medium rear tyres, he was able to switch to fresh options for the second start which worked better for him and allowed him to claim his maiden MotoGP victory.

“It’s been a nice weekend for me,” MotoGP’s newest winner said. “Friday I didn’t feel so confident, but I knew I had a big margin for Saturday.

“Saturday as soon as I went on track I was super competitive. Then we did the good job in FP4 trying with used tyres and I felt super confident.

“For sure I didn’t have the pace of Fabio [Quartararo] maybe, or Pecco, but I was close.

“Then with some steps in the right direction, making the pole position was amazing, but today the first start I felt ok but I had a lot of moments with the front tyre.

“So, luckily they stopped the race. I hope Savadori is ok, but luckily I could change both tyres and I felt super good in the second start.”

He added: “For my side, sometimes when I start from the box I feel there are some tyres that are working better and some tyres that are working worse.

“Today as soon as I went out of the pitlane I saw that the front wasn’t working perfectly and also when I was behind Pecco, in the second-last corner I almost crashed in the second lap.

“So, I was a bit scared, but luckily I had another new tyre and it was perfect.”

Crash at turn 2

Crash at turn 2

Photo by: Gold and Goose / Motorsport Images

Martin took the lead early on in the second start and resisted race-long pressure from Suzuki’s Joan Mir, eventually opening up a gap to the Suzuki rider in the closing stages.

The Pramac rookie says this gap was ultimately “necessary” for him as he began to struggle with his physical condition, as he continues to recover from the wrist injury sustained in a crash in Portugal in April.

“As soon as I could, I took the lead, trying to put my pace because I knew today was a race just to be constant all the race, and I was able to keep this 1m24.3s, 1m24.2s the whole race,” he explained.

“Joan was super strong today, but when I saw this little gap of two tenths in the board I just tried to put a little bit more in the track, making this gap was perfect for me and necessary also because the last laps my physical condition wasn’t great.

“But, really happy for my team and also for Ducati because here it’s so important to win for them.

“I wasn’t expecting to be the rider to win but finally I did it.”

shares
comments

Related video

Espargaro angry with MotoGP stewards after Marquez Styria clash
Previous article

Espargaro angry with MotoGP stewards after Marquez Styria clash

Next article

Dani Pedrosa “very lucky” in fiery Styria MotoGP crash

Dani Pedrosa “very lucky” in fiery Styria MotoGP crash
How MotoGP riders are preparing for the physical stress of sprint races Prime

How MotoGP riders are preparing for the physical stress of sprint races

With the expansion of the calendar to 21 grands prix and the introduction of sprint races, the 2023 MotoGP season will take the riders to almost 1,300 kilometres of more competition than this year, a factor that forces adjustments in their physical preparations.

Luca Marini: Why he's more than just Valentino Rossi's brother Prime

Luca Marini: Why he's more than just Valentino Rossi's brother

Surname pressure is something many have had to deal with in their motorsport careers. And while Luca Marini doesn’t have that, his familial relation and the team he rides for in MotoGP have cast a brighter spotlight on his progress. But, as he has shown in 2022 – and as he reveals to Motorsport.com – Marini is so much more than just the brother of a legend.

MotoGP
Dec 6, 2022
Ranking the top 10 MotoGP riders of 2022 Prime

Ranking the top 10 MotoGP riders of 2022

The 2022 MotoGP season was another hotly contested championship, with Francesco Bagnaia emerging as the title winner after the campaign went to the wire. Motorsport.com picks out the 10 best performers of the season

MotoGP
Nov 29, 2022
Was the MotoGP 2022 title won by Bagnaia or lost by Quartararo? Prime

Was the MotoGP 2022 title won by Bagnaia or lost by Quartararo?

Reigning MotoGP world champion Fabio Quartararo had a 91-point lead over rival Francesco Bagnaia after the German Grand Prix, a seemingly impregnable gap to overcome in the remaining 10 races. But as the Frenchman struggled for pace with his Yamaha, Bagnaia stormed back into contention and swept to Ducati's first riders' title since 2007

MotoGP
Nov 25, 2022
Why there's more to Honda's 2023 MotoGP bike than the Valencia test suggests Prime

Why there's more to Honda's 2023 MotoGP bike than the Valencia test suggests

After a run on Honda's 2023 prototype MotoGP bike, six-time champion Marc Marquez made his pessimism clear with his initial reaction. But the Japanese marque has made leadership changes behind closed doors - and a more representative bike promised for the Malaysia test in February could placate Marquez.

MotoGP
Nov 23, 2022
Why new MotoGP champion Bagnaia has a stronger character than it seems Prime

Why new MotoGP champion Bagnaia has a stronger character than it seems

While new MotoGP champion Francesco Bagnaia might not be the loudest rider on the grid, his calm exterior belies a steely backbone. His part in turning around Ducati's fortunes at the start of the year, when displeased with a new engine concept, shows the strength of his character.

MotoGP
Nov 16, 2022
Why Bagnaia's MotoGP triumph is as worthy as Stoner's Ducati breakthrough Prime

Why Bagnaia's MotoGP triumph is as worthy as Stoner's Ducati breakthrough

OPINION: Despite the superiority exhibited by the Ducati in 2022, the context in which Francesco Bagnaia became MotoGP world champion means that both the rider and the Italian marque merit the same recognition that the brand and Casey Stoner received after their 2007 title

MotoGP
Nov 9, 2022
Why the 2022 MotoGP season had a bittersweet ending Prime

Why the 2022 MotoGP season had a bittersweet ending

OPINION: MotoGP’s fifth last round showdown of the modern era delivered a tense finale despite the predictable outcome, as Francesco Bagnaia ended 15 years of pain for Ducati. But as emotions ran high for the Italian marque, a final victory for a departing Japanese rival tinged the campaign’s conclusion with sadness.

MotoGP
Nov 7, 2022