Aragon MotoGP: Marquez tops FP1 by a second, Vinales returns

Honda Marc Marquez dominated opening practice for the Aragon Grand Prix as Maverick Vinales made his official Aprilia debut on Friday morning.

Aragon MotoGP: Marquez tops FP1 by a second, Vinales returns

The biggest news coming into the Aragon weekend is Vinales’ debut with Aprilia following his factory Yamaha exit last month.

The nine-time MotoGP race winner – who completed a two-day test at Misano on the RS-GP prior to this weekend – was one of the first out on track and steadily chipped away at the lap times as he continues his adaptation process to the RS-GP.

Completing 21 laps, Vinales ended FP1 in 19th and 2.1 seconds off the pace – though that gap is greatly exaggerated by Marc Marquez’s late time attack.

Teruel GP poleman Takaaki Nakagami set the early pace on his LCR Honda in the 45-minute FP1 with a 1m50.283s, though championship leader Fabio Quartararo soon guided his Yamaha to a 1m50.185s.

Ten minutes into the session Aragon specialist Marquez shot to the top of the order with a 1m49.360s, with the factory Honda rider bettering that two lap later to a 1m49.171s.

A late flurry of quick laps at the end of FP1 led to several riders putting Marquez’s lap under pressure, but all came up just shy of toppling the Honda rider.

In the final moments of the session Marquez elected to go out on a fresh soft slick and duly blitzed the timesheets, the Honda rider streaking clear at the top of the order with a 1m48.048s.

With almost everyone not going out for a soft tyre time attack, Marquez was left to end FP1 comfortably clear of the field.

Marquez ended up 0.971s clear of Suzuki’s Joan Mir, the reigning world champion also fitted a fresh soft rear for a late blast – but had a better lap cancelled for exceeding track limits.

Ducati’s Francesco Bagnaia completed the top three with a 1m49.193s, while Alex Marquez lifted himself up to fourth on his LCR Honda after a late effort on a fresh medium rear.

Jack Miller completed the top five on the second factory team Ducati from Aprilia’s Aleix Espargaro, fresh from his Silverstone podium.

Johann Zarco was seventh on the Pramac Ducati from Quartararo, Nakagami and the second works team Honda of Pol Espargaro.

Yamaha test rider Cal Crutchlow continues to deputise for the ousted Vinales and was 12th at the end of FP1, while 2020 Aragon GP winner Alex Rins was a low-key 14th on the Suzuki.

Tech 3 KTM’s Iker Lecuona was an early faller at the penultimate corner, while Petronas SRT’s Valentino Rossi crashed at Turn 5 later on.

They ended FP1 16th and 20th respectively, while factory KTM duo Miguel Oliveira and Brad Binder were 18th and 21st as both appeared to trial a new chassis this morning.

Jake Dixon has been handed a second MotoGP outing with SRT standing in for the injured Franco Morbidelli and completed the 22-rider field. 

FP1 results:

Cla Rider Bike Time Gap
1 Spain Marc Marquez Honda 1'48.048  
2 Spain Joan Mir Suzuki 1'49.019 0.971
3 Italy Francesco Bagnaia Ducati 1'49.193 1.145
4 Spain Alex Marquez Honda 1'49.206 1.158
5 Australia Jack Miller Ducati 1'49.262 1.214
6 Spain Aleix Espargaro Aprilia 1'49.313 1.265
7 France Johann Zarco Ducati 1'49.372 1.324
8 France Fabio Quartararo Yamaha 1'49.451 1.403
9 Japan Takaaki Nakagami Honda 1'49.459 1.411
10 Spain Pol Espargaro Honda 1'49.589 1.541
11 Italy Enea Bastianini Ducati 1'49.652 1.604
12 United Kingdom Cal Crutchlow Yamaha 1'49.670 1.622
13 Italy Danilo Petrucci KTM 1'49.741 1.693
14 Spain Alex Rins Suzuki 1'49.784 1.736
15 Italy Luca Marini Ducati 1'49.936 1.888
16 Spain Iker Lecuona KTM 1'49.942 1.894
17 Spain Jorge Martin Ducati 1'49.947 1.899
18 Portugal Miguel Oliveira KTM 1'49.964 1.916
19 Spain Maverick Viñales Aprilia 1'50.187 2.139
20 Italy Valentino Rossi Yamaha 1'50.299 2.251
21 South Africa Brad Binder KTM 1'50.353 2.305
22 United Kingdom Jake Dixon Yamaha 1'51.188 3.140
shares
comments
2021 MotoGP Aragon Grand Prix – How to watch, session times & more

Previous article

2021 MotoGP Aragon Grand Prix – How to watch, session times & more

Next article

KTM MotoGP outcast Lecuona set for 2022 Honda WSBK switch

KTM MotoGP outcast Lecuona set for 2022 Honda WSBK switch
Load comments
Why Marc Marquez has to reinvent himself as a MotoGP rider Prime

Why Marc Marquez has to reinvent himself as a MotoGP rider

Marc Marquez's romp to victory at the Grand Prix of the Americas led many to believe the 'old' pre-injury Honda rider was close to coming back to his full powers. However, the 'old' Marquez will probably never exist again and instead he'll have to adapt to his new reality to return to title-winning ways in 2022.

MotoGP
Oct 6, 2021
Why self-preservation was key to Marquez's COTA "dream" result Prime

Why self-preservation was key to Marquez's COTA "dream" result

Marc Marquez scorched to his seventh Circuit of the Americas victory in MotoGP last Sunday with a display reminiscent of his pre-injury form. However, his path to the win across the weekend was in keeping with the current reality of his physical limitations, with self-preservation on Saturday key to his Sunday success

MotoGP
Oct 4, 2021
How Ducati has developed MotoGP's most versatile bike Prime

How Ducati has developed MotoGP's most versatile bike

His third place at Misano made Enea Bastianini the fifth different Ducati-mounted rider to score a podium in 2021. Amid a season that has seen one rider amass the bulk of Yamaha and Honda's success, the Ducati's versatility makes for a potent weapon, but the contribution of a former leading light shouldn't be forgotten

MotoGP
Sep 23, 2021
The next steps in the rebuilding of a stalled MotoGP career Prime

The next steps in the rebuilding of a stalled MotoGP career

Maverick Vinales’ early debut with Aprilia has been one of the most interesting plots of the recent MotoGP rounds. The results may not look standout on paper, but a closer inspection reveals just how much progress Vinales has truly made in understanding a bike that has taken him well out of his “comfort zone”.

MotoGP
Sep 22, 2021
Why Misano was a pivotal race for MotoGP's present and future Prime

Why Misano was a pivotal race for MotoGP's present and future

On a day each of the podium trio could claim to be the star of the show, the San Marino GP will be remembered as a pivotal race in both MotoGP's present and future. While Fabio Quartararo demonstrated his world title credentials just behind Francesco Bagnaia's flawless victory charge, a new threat emerged from the shadows

MotoGP
Sep 20, 2021
How Ducati's Aragon MotoGP win harks to its past and its future Prime

How Ducati's Aragon MotoGP win harks to its past and its future

Duelling against Marc Marquez at the Aragon Grand Prix, Francesco Bagnaia came out on top to secure a long overdue MotoGP victory. As Marquez likened Bagnaia to a Ducati title contender of old, it appears the Italian rider could finally start to fight for wins on a more regular basis

MotoGP
Sep 13, 2021
Why Dovizioso is more of a temporary fix than a Yamaha gamble Prime

Why Dovizioso is more of a temporary fix than a Yamaha gamble

OPINION: The return of Andrea Dovizioso to the grid at Misano will be an interesting subplot to the remainder of the 2021 MotoGP season. But the circumstances that have led to the former Ducati rider ending his sabbatical point to his signing being one more of convenience than a long-term commitment

MotoGP
Sep 8, 2021
Why the British GP was a triumph for MotoGP Prime

Why the British GP was a triumph for MotoGP

OPINION: The 2021 British Grand Prix was a historic day for MotoGP. At the centre of it was Aleix Espargaro on the Aprilia after securing its first podium in the modern MotoGP era. It was something of a full-circle moment that highlighted just how far MotoGP has come in the last decade

MotoGP
Aug 30, 2021