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Pole sitter cars, #33 Corvette Racing Chevrolet Corvette C8.R of Nicky Catsburg, Ben Keating, Nicolas Varrone, #50 Ferrari AF Corse Ferrari 499P of Antonio Fuoco, Miguel Molina, Nicklas Nielsen, #48 Idec Sport Oreca 07 - Gibson of Paul Lafargue, Paul Loup Chatin, Laurents Horr
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Special feature

10 things we've learned from Le Mans so far

The centenary edition of the Le Mans 24 Hours has no shortage of fascinating storylines brewing ahead of the race. Here’s what we’ve learned about the prospects of a first true multi-marque fight at the front since 2016, the exploits of the guesting Garage 56 NASCAR and the class battles bubbling under.

Ferrari isn’t as far ahead of Toyota as the timesheets from qualifying suggest. The gap between Antonio Fuoco on pole and Brendon Hartley in third at the end of Thursday’s Hyperpole session was 1.4s, but that’s to ignore a quicker lap from Kamui Kobayashi that would have reduced the margin to 1.2s had his mark not been scrubbed out for a track limits infraction.

Toyota, though, didn’t get the breaks with the red flag that stopped the half-hour session with five minutes left on the clock. The #8 Toyota GR010 HYBRID Le Mans Hypercar with Hartley at the wheel was on course for a time significantly quicker than his eventual best when the stoppage came.

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