Pikes Peak broadcast group chosen

The Peaks Peak International Hill Climb organization, announced today, May 2, that John Sandy Productions, Inc, (JSP)has been selected as the official producer of this year's Television program concerning the annual Pikes Peak auto race the...

The Peaks Peak International Hill Climb organization, announced today, May 2, that John Sandy Productions, Inc, (JSP)has been selected as the official producer of this year's Television program concerning the annual Pikes Peak auto race the weekend of July 21. The TV show will air in early August on Altitude Sports & Entertainment Network

John Santucci, president of JSP, said his company was elated to be associated with the Pikes Peak Hill Climb and stated " we are committed to making this one of the most spectacular sporting events to appear on Television. Why shouldn't it? Just behind the Indianapolis 500, this is the second most historical auto race in the nation, And, as this is its 85th year, we plan to pull out all the stops."

Planning is already underway, and JSP has staffed several new faces including network award wining producer/director David Grigg with 27 years of network sports Television experience.

Production of the hill climb is mentally and physically challenging, and dangerous.

The course starts at the 9200 foot elevation mark, and winds its way upward for 13 miles finishing at 14,100 feet. TV Cameramen not only have to watch their footing on the rocky, sometimes wet and slick, tundra, but must be very aware of the racing activity as well. Purpose built racers hit speeds of over 125 miles per hour at times on the course, and guard rails are non-existent. Only about half the course is paved. paved.

Plus, weather at this altitude is always a factor. Fog, lightning, rain and snow can be a problem even in July. So, besides lugging a camera, a microphone, cables, and a radio; each man has to have extra clothing, raingear, water. food, and batteries, lots of batteries.

Last years race saw sunshine, fog, rain, sleet, snow, and ice by early afternoon. In fact, the course had to shortened (the third time in five years), due to mud, ice and snow conditions on top of the mountain!

No one is allowed up or down the course once actual racing starts. There are no alternate routes, up or down, in or out, the road course is it. So, once racing begins, everyone along the course must hold their position until the racing ends. "It's always a problem a camera crews spread along 13 miles of a mountainous terrain. constant communication is critical in order to safely "get those shots". We'll be using a helicopter, a big help. But, we'll still have to have things pretty well "scripted" by race day. Radios and walkie talkies will be our primary communication!" Santucci explained.

Pikes Peak International Hill Climb is the world's highest auto race and one of the most grueling. As the drivers climb toward the summit, the thin air slows reflexes and saps muscle strength. The altitude robs engines of 30% of their power at the summit. So competitors and vehicles must be in top shape simply to finish, let alone win.

The 13 mile course has 156 turns and the road surface turns to gravel and dirt at about the halfway mark. Although every corner in the race deserves full respect, the one named "Bottomless Pit" gets top billing as the one not to miss. No one has ever missed that corner, which would result in a 6,000 foot drop

The current record run is 10 minutes and 4 seconds.

John Sandy Productions, Inc is a full-service video production company located in the Denver Technical Center. For the past 25 years, JSP have been producing the video need of area corporations, retail & service firms, educational and broadcast entities, and for local, state, and national government agencies. They are also known as producers of quality broadcast programs for, local, regional and national Television outlets.

-credit: jsptv

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Series Hillclimb