Toyota Canada Superbike Championship Rules Update

SPORT BIKE LIMIT STRETCHED December 2, 1998 TORONTO, ON - Both support classes in the Toyota Canada Superbike Championship have had their maximum horsepower limits raised for the 1999 season. Competitors in the Yoshimura 600 Sport...

SPORT BIKE LIMIT STRETCHED

December 2, 1998

TORONTO, ON - Both support classes in the Toyota Canada Superbike Championship have had their maximum horsepower limits raised for the 1999 season.

Competitors in the Yoshimura 600 Sport Bike category will be allowed to run up to 105 horsepower in post race tech while the International Motorcycle SUPERSHOW Open Sport Bike class limit is now 140 hp.

Horsepower readings for the top five finishers in each support class are taken from the official series Dynojet rear wheel dyno following both qualifying heats and feature races at each round of the Toyota Canada Superbike Championship.

Both classes will retain a minimum weight of 380 pounds.

The horsepower increase is the second for 600 Sport Bike since the maximum horsepower/minimum weight support class rules formula was adopted at the start of the 1997 season. The limit was originally 102 horsepower and raised to 103 hp before the 1998 season.

This is the first increase for Open Sport Bike, which previously had a 138-hp limit.

"There were two issues to deal with as far as the 600 class was concerned," said Toyota Canada Superbike Championship director Colin Fraser. "We wanted the class to stay competitive at the front and also keep the class accessible to privateers. The arrival of two new bikes, the Yamaha YZF R6 and Honda CBR600F4, were a concern."

Don Munroe won the Yoshimura 600 Sport Bike class title in 1998 riding a Kawasaki ZX-6R but feature races were also won by Honda's CBR600F3 and the Suzuki GSX-R600.

"Last year the GSX-R600 and ZX-6R were consistently high horsepower performers," added Fraser. "With the addition of new models from Honda and Yamaha, we are looking at a very, very competitive 600 class in 1999."

There are no new bikes for the International Motorcycle SUPERSHOW Open Sport Bike class in 1999, although the arrival of Kawasaki's ZX-9R and the Yamaha YZF R1 in 1998 saw a sharp increase in performance in that division as well. Michael Taylor rode a ZX-9R to the class title last season.

"These horsepower changes weren't introduced to increase people's expenses, but to keep pace with the technology being introduced into these classes," said John Bayliss of Yamaha Motor Canada. "We hope to set a standard where by adding a pipe and jet kit a racer can safely come close to the limit."

Both Yoshimura and the International Motorcycle SUPERSHOW will return to sponsor the national support classes for a third straight season in 1999.

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