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Whiting resists Strategy Group push for no track limit restrictions

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Whiting resists Strategy Group push for no track limit restrictions
By:
Jul 29, 2016, 11:48 AM

FIA race director Charlie Whiting is resisting a push from the F1 Strategy Group to put a stop to penalties for track limits offences.

The Strategy Group felt that drivers running over kerbs was good for the show, and that penalties were no popular.

The FIA is believed to want more time to understand the implications of this before adopting a final stance.

However, Whiting said he wants to keep track limits under control, and said there are fewer and fewer corners where drivers can gain an advantage.

"It was proposed by some that we should take a completely relaxed view on track limits," he said today.

"But I felt that was inappropriate. I think we should carry on doing what we do.

"My principal aim has always been trying to get the track to conform to the track limits, if you see what I mean. I think by and large we've done that, but there are certain corners on certain tracks that do present us with little problems. We are getting rid of them one by one.

"Here I think we're in a similar position to Hungary – with Turns Four and Eleven in Hungary, Turn One here. It's a similar sort of thing, we saw 93 cars go off there today [in FP1] so we need to have a careful think what to do tomorrow.

"The difficulty of allowing complete freedom, i.e. allowing everyone to go wide and taking no notice of it, is simply that there would be a different track, fundamentally. It would be faster and with less run-off area. So we couldn't possibly contemplate that."

Red Bull boss Christian Horner insisted that drivers should not be penalised for going wide.

"I think the problem with where there track limits are or aren't is that the tracks are used for F1 and MotoGP," Strategy Group member Horner told Motorsport.com.

"And perhaps what's suitable for F1 is not suitable for MotoGP, and vice versa.

"The basis of the conversation we had is let the drivers be free. At some point they will is be slower if they go too wide. Let them use what's available, and it can only be more spectacular. Turn One here is a classic example of cars running wide and using all the available road.

"That shouldn't be penalised. If you drive down the grass and cut a corner out and overtake someone, that is obviously a bigger issue."

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Series Formula 1
Author Adam Cooper