Theissen comments on Austria and Williams

BMW motorsport director Mario Theissen gives his comments on the Austrian Grand Prix and the future of BMW and Williams "For the BMW WilliamsF1 Team, the Grand Prix of Austria in Spielberg was two-faced. Juan Pablo Montoya has been leading the...

BMW motorsport director Mario Theissen gives his comments on the Austrian Grand Prix and the future of BMW and Williams

"For the BMW WilliamsF1 Team, the Grand Prix of Austria in Spielberg was two-faced. Juan Pablo Montoya has been leading the field in his FW25 for eight laps. Then he was forced to retire due to a defect in the car's cooling system. The upswing is obvious. Ralf, finishing the race in sixth position, scored three world championship points and he is the only driver who managed to bring his car home in points in all six races of the running season. However, our yield of points at the as yet last Grand Prix in Austria was disappointing."

Juan Pablo Montoya.
Photo by Brousseau Photo.
"The Grand Prix marks the first engine failure for the team since Suzuka. We still have to give the BMW engine P83 a first-class reference. The engine is stronger than ever and fighting fit. In the case of Juan Pablo's car, a leak in the radiator caused coolant to constantly leak from the system. And without cooling the engine simply cannot run."

"We already identified the looming difficulties before the start of the race, but decided to keep Juan Pablo in the race until his car would force him to drop-out. It was important for us to see that our car is able to keep pace with the top of the field, which Juan Pablo then demonstrated in the race. This performance is based on the constant further development, which keeps the entire team at their toes almost 24 hours the day. The FW25 in Spielberg was already completely different to the FW25 in Melbourne."

"Further development of the FW25 is one thing, the team's strategic concept, however, is even more important as we are looking into the future. For BMW, one prior aim is to take part in a future partnership that goes beyond the current role of an engine manufacturer. A conglomerate like BMW has enormous resources available and we want these resources to pour into the project."

"Currently, we are about to dovetail pieces together. We offer WilliamsF1 access to our resources and capacities. As a car manufacturer, BMW has possibilities which a Formula 1 team naturally cannot offer. Developments in the street car sector can also be used in Formula 1. We therefore have to fathom out which resources are suitable for a joint project. An expanding partnership bears chances and risks of course, but we believe that the chances gain the upper hand."

"Competitiveness mainly depends on four essential factors. First: competence of the team members. Second: workflow and processes, which means, who is going to do what and when, and how all activities interact. Thirdly: corresponding structures and organisation. And fourth: resources, which are team members, facilities, and financial means. These are the four topics currently being discussed in the negotiations with WilliamsF1 -- it's not about the current performance of the FW25."

"Actually the contract was due to be signed and sealed before the start of the season. But in the course of the negotiations, we came to realise how complex the matter is. Ever new aspects came up and were being discussed. That takes time, and we take that time. There is no deadline fixed. It's more important to find the perfect solution since we still aim at the world championship's title."

-bmw-

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About this article
Series Formula 1
Drivers Juan Pablo Montoya
Teams Williams