Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis

Tech gallery: How the Force India VJM10 evolved throughout 2017

A selection of the best technical images of Force India’s 2017 challenger, the VJM10, courtesy of Giorgio Piola, Sutton Images and LAT images

In detail

In detail
1/35

Close-up of the front wheel rim and blown axle.

Photo by: Sutton Images

In detail

In detail
2/35

Rear view of the steering wheel shows the shape and detail employed on the clutch paddles.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Australian GP

Australian GP
3/35

The front wing under construction with different upper flap options available.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Bahrain GP

Bahrain GP
4/35

The team made revisions to the area ahead and around the sidepods, the sidepod airflow conditioner also had an extra support added (red arrow).

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Bahrain GP

Bahrain GP
5/35

The floor extension behind the bargeboards was modified to include these slots (arrows), changing the flow pattern around them.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Bahrain GP

Bahrain GP
6/35

A comparison of the turning vanes used in China and Bahrain shows the removal of the long slot in the forwardmost element. The yellow line highlights the change in shape to the rearward one.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Bahrain GP

Bahrain GP
7/35

Changes made to the bargeboards and airflow conditioners with the launch car inset for comparison. More slots were introduced to the main bargeboard (red arrows), the pre-bargeboard was extended (white arrow) and the airflow conditioners connection to the sidepod was reduced in width (yellow arrow).

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Monaco GP

Monaco GP
8/35

The team added a triple element T-wing and monkey seat to help balance the car in Monaco.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Canadian GP

Canadian GP
9/35

Changes made to the bargeboards, with the corner shape of each section optimised (white arrow) and the pre-bargeboard extended (red arrow).

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Azerbaijan GP

Azerbaijan GP
10/35

Force India ran without the endplate canards in Azerbaijan and Canada.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Azerbaijan GP

 Azerbaijan GP
11/35

The wing complete with canards for comparison.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Austrian GP

Austrian GP
12/35

A kiel probe array is mounted behind the car during practice to gather data.

Photo by: Sutton Images

British GP

British GP
13/35

Side view of the changes made by Force India to its front wing, including an additional slot in the mainplane and increase in the number of upper flaps from two to three.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

British GP

British GP
14/35

The swept cockpit canards added to the VJM10 at the Austrian GP (blue arrows).

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

British GP

British GP
15/35

Side view of the bargeboard area. Note the continuation of the mini-winglets between the pre-bargeboard and main bargeboard.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Hungarian GP

Hungarian GP
16/35

A look at the VJM10’s front suspension, including the large third or ‘heave’ element mounted horizontally between the rockers.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Belgian GP

Belgian GP
17/35

A look at the VJM10’s front brake assembly while the car is being prepared shows the various routes airflow must navigate to both cool the brakes and improve aero.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Italian GP

Italian GP
18/35

Close-up of the VJM10’s diffuser with flo-viz applied.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Italian GP

Italian GP
19/35

Close-up of the VJM10’s main exhaust and wastegate exhausts, which have been conjoined.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Singapore GP

Singapore GP
20/35

The ‘Stegosaurus’ added by the team in Singapore is a row of multiple winglets on either side of the engine cover's spine, which create a series of smaller vortices that entwine to create a larger vortex and improve the performance of the shark fin. Also noted is the wider airbox winglet (blue arrow) which is similar to a design employed by Williams (inset).

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Malaysian GP

Malaysian GP
21/35

A nice view of the mid section of the chassis shows how the serrated sections of the turning vanes and bargeboards have a different aspect.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Singapore GP

Singapore GP
22/35

Comparison of the two T-wing designs used in Singapore and Monaco, with the extra slots added for Singapore highlighted in yellow.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Mexico GP

Mexico GP
23/35

A great ¾ view of the sidepod and the area ahead of it which features complex structures such as the bargeboards.

United States GP

United States GP
24/35

The two element monkey seat introduced in Japan, with additional crash structure winglets too (red arrow). The more simplistic monkey seat can be seen in the inset for comparison.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Mexican GP

Mexican GP
25/35

The team optimised the bargeboard area of the car further in Mexico, changing the shape of each serration in its upper surface (red arrow), revising the shape of the pre-bargebaord (blue arrow), adding a row of mini-winglets (green arrow) and increasing the height of the last section of the main bargeboard to form a deflector (white arrow).

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Mexican GP

Mexican GP
26/35

The team tested, but did not race, a solution already seen on the Mercedes W08 and Red Bull RB13, three strakes placed on the leading edge of the upturned floor - breaking up turbulence and creating their own set of vortices.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Mexican GP

Mexican GP
27/35

A close up of the VJM10’s front wing from behind showing just how aggressive the compartmentalisation of the wing is in order to create the outwash tunnel.

Photo by: Mark Sutton

Mexican GP

Mexican GP
28/35

A close-up of the front wing endplate shows the detail of the two endplate canards deployed by the team.

Photo by: Mark Sutton

Mexican GP

Mexican GP
29/35

A close-up of the triple element T-wing, which has slots in the leading edge of each element in order to improve efficiency. Note the small swan neck-style supports in the centre of each slot to bridge the gap and stop it closing as pressure builds.

Photo by: Mark Sutton

Mexican GP

Mexican GP
30/35

The two-element turning vanes have multiple serrations in their footplate to trip the airflow, creating smaller vortices that roll up and combine to create a larger vortex.

Photo by: Mark Sutton

Brazilian GP

Brazilian GP
31/35

The team applied to the leading edge of the first winglet element on the monkey seat, reducing thermal transfer from the exhaust which is in close proximity.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Brazilian GP

Brazilian GP
32/35

The team mounted a kiel probe array behind the rear wheel in Brazil to study the behaviour and interaction of the diffuser and wheel wake.

Photo by: Mark Sutton

Brazilian GP

Brazilian GP
33/35

Looking over the top of the front suspension at the bargeboards, floor and sidepods.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Brazilian GP

Brazilian GP
34/35

A close-up of the front wing which is split into two distinct sections, the outer of which, left in bare carbon, is shaped in order to manipulate the wake shed by the front tyre.

Photo by: Mark Sutton

Brazilian GP

Brazilian GP
35/35

Mechanics work on the VJM10 with the covers off, leaving detailed areas of the car exposed.

Photo by: Mark Sutton
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About this article
Series Formula 1
Teams Force India
Article type Top List
Topic Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis