Singapore GP: Perez wins, but faces post-race investigation

Red Bull's Sergio Perez beat Ferrari driver Charles Leclerc in an action-packed 2022 Formula 1 Singapore Grand Prix, but the Mexican faces a post-race investigation.

Singapore GP: Perez wins, but faces post-race investigation
Listen to this article

The race was delayed by one hour and five minutes due to torrential rain falling in the build-up to the original 8pm start time, but the result was actually not confirmed at the chequered flag as Perez faces a post-race investigation for a safety car infringement.

That had been called into action twice, with three virtual safety car activations also taking place in the wet-to-dry thriller.

At the start, Leclerc and Perez made identical reactions from the front row but the Red Bull accelerated better as they raced away from the line and he swept past the Ferrari to comfortably seize the lead into Turn 1.

Behind, Carlos Sainz and Lewis Hamilton went side-by-side through Turn 1 and made light contact just ahead of the Turn 2 apex, which sent the Mercedes wide and down to third, the incident reviewed by the stewards by deemed not worthy of a full investigation.

The same thing happened for Max Verstappen cutting the first corner after he had bogged down badly leaving the line as his car nearly went into anti-stall mode and he fell from eighth to 12th.

Up front, Perez scampered clear of Leclerc – but only to the tune of around a second over the first phase of the race, with Sainz and Hamilton – complaining about his inters to Mercedes very early – soon distanced by over five seconds.

Perez set a series of fastest laps but could only pull out a lead of 1.4s before Leclerc began to home back in, reaching 0.8s behind the Red Bull at the end of lap eight of the scheduled 61.

But there the race was neutralised by a safety car period, extending the streak of every Singapore race featuring such an intervention.

It was called to cover the Alfa Romeo of Zhou Guanyu being recovered from the Turn 5 escape road, where he had parked up after Nicholas Latifi had drifted across his path and sent him into the wall.

This broke Zhou's front-right wheel and put him out on the spot, while Latifi toured back to the pits with a puncture, where he too retired.

The race resumed at the start of lap 11 with none of the leaders having chosen to pit – the track as it did between FP3 and qualifying taking a long time to dry, hence Perez and Leclerc lapping quickest in the 2m00s bracket.

Perez aced the restart and immediately re-established his one-second gap to Leclerc, who also again quickly dropped Sainz and Hamilton – the pre-safety car scenes recreated as the two leaders were the only drivers to now lap in the 1m59s bracket.

They exchanged fastest laps before Perez began to edge away, with his lead reaching 1.7s by lap 15 and the quarter-distance mark, where the leaders began to be warned by their teams to cool their inters on the remaining wet patches, with the track still nowhere near the crossover point for slicks.

The leaders reached the 1m58s bracket just before lap 20, at which point Perez's lead went over two seconds for the first time.

Leclerc had just started to slide quickly further back, the race was suspended again with a virtual safety car activation on lap 21 when Fernando Alonso pulled off at Turn 10, his 350th F1 start ending with an apparent engine problem.

The leaders again eschewed pitting for new inters, but back in 15th George Russell made a bold call to take medium slicks.

The VSC lasted two laps, with Perez's lead over Leclerc resuming at 2.5s but after just three further tours the first of two further VSC activations kicked in when Alex Albon – a lap one spinner at the rear of the pack – slid into the Turn 8 barriers and knocked his front wing off.

He reversed away and drove back to the pits to retire the other Williams, with the VSC ending on lap 27 but being activated again on lap 28 because Esteban Ocon's Alpine had also retired with an engine issue – the Frenchman's expiring in a massive blowout over the Anderson Bridge and approaching Turn 13.

Racing resumed on lap 30, with Perez's lead up to 4.3s before Leclerc shot into the 1m56s and he cut the gap back down to under three seconds within two tours.

Here a series of dramatic events took place in the background, with Hamilton, who had been very frustrated tucked up behind Sainz sliding into the barriers solo as he chased the Ferrari on lap 33.

He reversed away and rejoined just in front of 2021 title rival Verstappen, who in turn had been hotly perusing Lando Norris.

On lap one, Verstappen had looked to make quick progress back past Kevin Magnussen, but did not have an easy time of it.

He dived past the Haas at Turn 7, but on the exit appeared to squeeze the Haas towards the wall, the pair making contact and Magnussen's left-front wing endplate getting damaged.

Magnussen then barged Verstappen out of the way at the tight Turn 11 left just before the Anderson Bridge, but the world champion made his way by on the next lap.

The Turn 7 incident was later investigated by the stewards, but no penalty was given despite Magnussen being forced to pit to have his front wing changed by the officials just before the safety car appeared.

Verstappen by that point had also passed Yuki Tsunoda before getting stuck behind Sebastian Vettel and running over 20s off the race lead.

That gap was erased by the neutralisation, after which Verstappen jumped Vettel and Pierre Gasly to run seventh by one-quarter distance.

But again he got stuck, this time behind Alonso and he remained there until the Alpine retired ahead.

Verstappen was soon all over Norris's rear but did not look likely to a quick pass before the Albon and Ocon VSCs – at the end of the second named nearly overtaking Norris when trying to get an early restart jump and falling back.

It was into the gap Hamilton slotted, but his left-front endplate was damaged, which Verstappen reported over the radio in the hope of the Mercedes being black-and-white flagged.

Now at just past the halfway point, Russell was finally setting purple sectors on his slicks, albeit way off the back of the pack.

This triggered a wave of cars to come into the pits, with Tsunoda among the first to do so and take mediums.

But he pushed too hard on his second full lap on the slicks and smashed into the Turn 10 barrier, triggering another safety car.

Perez and Leclerc had already come into the pits – the Ferrari doing so first on lap 34 – before the race was neutralised again on lap 36 so Tsunoda's wrecked car could be recovered.

Sainz, Hamilton and Verstappen had done likewise, with the Mercedes getting a new nose fitted, while Norris stayed out.

He came in under the safety car, which preserved his lead over Verstappen and they were the centre of attention at the lap 40 restart as Perez and Leclerc, weaving to build temperature into their mediums, easily restored their advantage over Sainz.

On the restart lap, Verstappen immediately moved to pass Norris after the Turn 6 kink down the track's first long acceleration zone following the corner where Zhou and Latifi had clashed so long before.

But his car appeared to bottom out as he went offline and the world champion locked both his front wheels, severely damaging his mediums.

He pitted at the end of the lap and fell to 13th, with the action at the front hotting up as Leclerc fired his slicks up to temperature better than Perez.

He put the Mexican under severe pressure for nearly 10 laps, with it now clear the race would end at the two-hour time limit and not go the scheduled distance.

Perez reported engine driveability issues under braking and while accelerating out of corners, which compound his attempts to break free from Leclerc's lost attention.

This became even harder when DRS was finally activated on lap 43 and here Leclerc's thrilling pursuit began.

Time and again he feigned to Perez's inside at every major stop around the Marina Bay track – locking up briefly at Turn 15 on lap 45.

The next two times by there, Perez had major lock-ups too, but he was soaking up the pressure well.

Leclerc got the gap down to 0.4s at the end of lap 47, but having to catch a massive oversteer slide at Turn 16 meant he lost critical momentum and dropped out of DRS range.

He never regained it thereafter, a lap 52 Turn 16 near-off finally breaking his pursuit as Perez's lead shot to 2.6s.

The was still work for the leader to do as he had been placed under investigation following the second safety car restart, apparently for dropping too far back from 10 lengths allowed to the pace car too early, something Hamilton suggested Perez also did at the first safety car restart.

He therefore charged to a winning margin of 7.5s over what was a final distance of 59 laps, with Ferrari telling Leclerc after he crossed the line second that Perez could be facing a pair of five-second penalties if found to be at fault in the investigation.

Sainz took a distant third having never had his teammate's pace at any point, with Norris also lonely in fourth once Verstappen had erred, ahead of Daniel Ricciardo, who had also stopped under the safety car and so gained against his Aston Martin rivals.

Lance Stroll was the top green car home – ahead of Verstappen who had put in yet another fight back now on softs, rising back to the points over the concluding laps.

It looked as if he might stay ninth for the finish as he was bottled up again, this time behind Hamilton before the seven-time world champion made another mistake.

While sandwiched between Verstappen and Vettel up ahead, Hamilton tried to pass the second Aston on lap 57, but slid deep having taken to a still-wet part of the track approaching Turn 8.

This allowed Verstappen through and he got Vettel on the last lap, with Hamilton finishing ninth ahead of Gasly.

Russell finished at the rear of the pack behind Valtteri Bottas (11th), who he had lightly hit in a passing lunge during the early stages.

Magnussen took 12th ahead of his teammate Mick Schumacher, who Russell also collided with – this time at Turn 1 just after the second safety car restart in an incident that was investigated but not deemed worthy of punishment.

Russell stopped four times, with a late final service for a second set of softs that he used to set the race's fastest lap at 1m46.458, for which he will not get a bonus point as he finished 14th.

Cla Driver Chassis Engine Gap
1 Mexico Sergio Perez Red Bull Red Bull  
2 Monaco Charles Leclerc Ferrari Ferrari 7.595
3 Spain Carlos Sainz Ferrari Ferrari 15.305
4 United Kingdom Lando Norris McLaren Mercedes 26.133
5 Australia Daniel Ricciardo McLaren Mercedes 58.282
6 Canada Lance Stroll Aston Martin Mercedes 1'01.330
7 Netherlands Max Verstappen Red Bull Red Bull 1'03.825
8 Germany Sebastian Vettel Aston Martin Mercedes 1'05.032
9 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Mercedes Mercedes 1'06.515
10 France Pierre Gasly AlphaTauri Red Bull 1'14.576
11 Finland Valtteri Bottas Alfa Romeo Ferrari 1'33.844
12 Denmark Kevin Magnussen Haas Ferrari 1'37.610
13 Germany Mick Schumacher Haas Ferrari  
14 United Kingdom George Russell Mercedes Mercedes  
  Japan Yuki Tsunoda AlphaTauri Red Bull  
  France Esteban Ocon Alpine Renault  
  Thailand Alex Albon Williams Mercedes  
  Spain Fernando Alonso Alpine Renault  
  Canada Nicholas Latifi Williams Mercedes  
  China Zhou Guanyu Alfa Romeo Ferrari  
 
shares
comments

Related video

Singapore GP 2022: Lap by lap visualization
Previous article

Singapore GP 2022: Lap by lap visualization

Next article

Verstappen blames anti-stall for poor Singapore GP start

Verstappen blames anti-stall for poor Singapore GP start
How departing F1 boss Brawn views F1’s new rules - and the future Prime

How departing F1 boss Brawn views F1’s new rules - and the future

Multiple-title-winning designer and team boss Ross Brawn is finally leaving Formula 1 after nearly 50 years in motorsport. But he still has plenty of insights on what’s working and what comes next, as he revealed to Motorsport.com in a far-reaching exclusive interview in Abu Dhabi.

The key F1 management call Ferrari must make to avoid more defeat Prime

The key F1 management call Ferrari must make to avoid more defeat

OPINION: Mattia Binotto’s departure from Ferrari will naturally bring a range of changes across the Formula 1 team. But how the changes shape up and the impact they could have is set to be dictated by a key direction Ferrari’s top dogs will need to pick

Formula 1
Nov 30, 2022
The difference between Mercedes’ stumble and the fall of F1 giants Prime

The difference between Mercedes’ stumble and the fall of F1 giants

OPINION: Mercedes endured its worst season of the hybrid Formula 1 era, but was mercifully spared its first winless campaign in over a decade late on. It has owned up to the mistakes it made which led to its troubled W13. And while its task to return to title-challenging contention is not small, its 2022 season seems more like a blip than the beginning of a downward spiral.

Formula 1
Nov 29, 2022
The physical focus bringing out the best from Esteban Ocon Prime

The physical focus bringing out the best from Esteban Ocon

Esteban Ocon likes to point out he’s the first driver since Lewis Hamilton to emerge from a spell as Fernando Alonso’s teammate with a superior overall points record. While some may disagree, as LUKE SMITH discovered, the 2021 Hungarian GP winner reckons it’s not just luck which has made him France’s pre-eminent Formula 1 driver of the moment…

Formula 1
Nov 28, 2022
How Red Bull's dynamic leader Mateschitz shaped its F1 philosophy Prime

How Red Bull's dynamic leader Mateschitz shaped its F1 philosophy

The death of Dietrich Mateschitz last month has not only deprived Red Bull of its visionary founder, it has shorn Formula 1 of one of its most influential benefactors. Mateschitz himself was famously media-shy, preferring to let the brand do the talking on his behalf. And, while it’s now normal to speak of Red Bull F1 titles and champions made, Mateschitz never assumed it would be easy or even possible – as ANTHONY ROWLINSON discovered during this previously unpublished interview from 2006…

Formula 1
Nov 27, 2022
Can Mercedes break Formula 1's cycle of doom? Prime

Can Mercedes break Formula 1's cycle of doom?

OPINION: Teams that have dominated for long periods throughout Formula 1's history often take years to get back to the top of the tree once they've slipped down. But it remains to be seen whether the same will happen to Mercedes after a challenging 2022 season

Formula 1
Nov 24, 2022
What hurt Perez most in his ill-fated fight for second in Abu Dhabi Prime

What hurt Perez most in his ill-fated fight for second in Abu Dhabi

Arguably the favourite in the battle to finish second-best in 2022's Formula 1 standings, Sergio Perez's two-stop strategy at Abu Dhabi couldn't take him ahead of Charles Leclerc when the music stopped - and several key factors ultimately precluded him from the much-coveted runner-up spot.

Formula 1
Nov 23, 2022
The Abu Dhabi momentum that can propel Leclerc and Ferrari to F1 2023 success Prime

The Abu Dhabi momentum that can propel Leclerc and Ferrari to F1 2023 success

OPINION: Charles Leclerc achieved his target of sealing runner-up in the 2022 world championship with a masterful drive behind Max Verstappen in Abu Dhabi. And that race contained key elements that may help him, and Ferrari, go one better in Formula 1 2023

Formula 1
Nov 22, 2022