Red Bull open to building own F1 engine from 2025

Red Bull has given the firmest indication yet that it will look to produce its own Formula 1 engine when new rules come into play in 2025.

Red Bull open to building own F1 engine from 2025
Listen to this article

The Milton Keynes-based squad has just announced a deal to take over the Honda F1 engine project and run the power units itself from next year.

Having given the green light for a major investment at its headquarters as it sets up Red Bull Powertrains, the team admits that it is not viewing the Honda takeover as just a short-term project prior to looking elsewhere in the future.

Instead, Red Bull team principal Christian Horner is clear that the most logical thing for Red Bull to do would be to lay the groundwork for the construction of its own engine when new rules come in for 2025.

"It needs to be a long-term view, because obviously the investment into the facilities to gear up for this are quite significant," explained Horner.

"You've both got a short-term scenario of the existing regulations, and then of course whatever the new regulations are. We need to be in a position to take that on as well."

He added: "We will have a facility capable of designing and operating the next generation of engines with a facility that will be invested within here."

Read Also:

While Red Bull is happy to brand its current engines under its own name from 2022, its long term plans could trigger it bringing in a fresh manufacturer to F1.

With its own facilities up and running to prepare the engine, it could be enough to entice a car maker that does not have its own F1 infrastructure ready to go.

Horner said that a tie-up with a manufacturer would not be essential if Red Bull was to produce its own engine from 2025, but it was open to the idea.

"If an exciting partner comes along, then of course it would make sense to look at it very seriously, whether that be an OEM or another type of partner, a battery manufacturer or whatever. It really depends what the engines are," he said.

F1 chiefs and engine manufacturers have begun discussions about framing new engine regulations from 2025, with the sport committing to a new hybrid concept.

Horner said the fact that the future power units would not be completely different to what is currently used was a boost to Red Bull's hopes of committing to a long term project.

"Of course, what we will need to understand is what are those new regulations," he explained. "Obviously, the sooner the better for everybody, but one assumes from the latest discussions with the FIA that it is likely to be a combustion engine.

"There's going to be, probably, 100 percent, sustainable fuels. There will probably be a slightly bigger emphasis on the energy recovery system. So the topography of what the engine is going to be isn't dramatically removed from where we are, it's just evolved.

"Therefore, the facility that we put in place for the current engine will have relevance of course to the future engines."

shares
comments

Related video

McLaren's Mercedes dyno testing has been "problem free"
Previous article

McLaren's Mercedes dyno testing has been "problem free"

Next article

Alpine announces launch date for 2021 F1 car

Alpine announces launch date for 2021 F1 car
How Red Bull's dynamic leader Mateschitz shaped its F1 philosophy Prime

How Red Bull's dynamic leader Mateschitz shaped its F1 philosophy

The death of Dietrich Mateschitz last month has not only deprived Red Bull of its visionary founder, it has shorn Formula 1 of one of its most influential benefactors. Mateschitz himself was famously media-shy, preferring to let the brand do the talking on his behalf. And, while it’s now normal to speak of Red Bull F1 titles and champions made, Mateschitz never assumed it would be easy or even possible – as ANTHONY ROWLINSON discovered during this previously unpublished interview from 2006…

Can Mercedes break Formula 1's cycle of doom? Prime

Can Mercedes break Formula 1's cycle of doom?

OPINION: Teams that have dominated for long periods throughout Formula 1's history often take years to get back to the top of the tree once they've slipped down. But it remains to be seen whether the same will happen to Mercedes after a challenging 2022 season

Formula 1
Nov 24, 2022
What hurt Perez most in his ill-fated fight for second in Abu Dhabi Prime

What hurt Perez most in his ill-fated fight for second in Abu Dhabi

Arguably the favourite in the battle to finish second-best in 2022's Formula 1 standings, Sergio Perez's two-stop strategy at Abu Dhabi couldn't take him ahead of Charles Leclerc when the music stopped - and several key factors ultimately precluded him from the much-coveted runner-up spot.

Formula 1
Nov 23, 2022
The Abu Dhabi momentum that can propel Leclerc and Ferrari to F1 2023 success Prime

The Abu Dhabi momentum that can propel Leclerc and Ferrari to F1 2023 success

OPINION: Charles Leclerc achieved his target of sealing runner-up in the 2022 world championship with a masterful drive behind Max Verstappen in Abu Dhabi. And that race contained key elements that may help him, and Ferrari, go one better in Formula 1 2023

Formula 1
Nov 22, 2022
2022 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix Driver Ratings Prime

2022 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix Driver Ratings

The 2022 Formula 1 season came to a close at the Yas Marina Circuit, where the battle for second in the standings was decided, the wins in a season record extended and a retiring four-time world champion bowed out on a high. Here's how we rated the drivers

Formula 1
Nov 21, 2022
The factors that stopped Perez catching Leclerc in Verstappen's Abu Dhabi triumph Prime

The factors that stopped Perez catching Leclerc in Verstappen's Abu Dhabi triumph

Max Verstappen ended the 2022 Formula 1 season in fitting fashion with a dominant drive to victory in the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix. But behind him, early season rival Charles Leclerc achieved his target of securing the runner-up spot with a well-executed a one-stop strategy to beat Sergio Perez, whose pursuit on a two-stop strategy was hampered by several critical factors

Formula 1
Nov 21, 2022
Why the impact of FIA’s anti-bouncing metric is hard to judge Prime

Why the impact of FIA’s anti-bouncing metric is hard to judge

Faced with drivers complaining about the long-term health effects of car ‘bouncing’, the FIA stepped in to deal with it. JAKE BOXALL-LEGGE explains how the so-called ‘Aerodynamic Oscillation Metric’ works, and asks if it is fit for purpose?

Formula 1
Nov 20, 2022
Where Vettel stands in the list of the greatest F1 drivers Prime

Where Vettel stands in the list of the greatest F1 drivers

As Sebastian Vettel’s Formula 1 career draws to a close, figuring out where he fits into the greatest of all time order is a tough and subjective call. With the aid of statistics, attributes and history, here’s how the four-time world champion stacks up in the debate

Formula 1
Nov 19, 2022