Mosley looks forward to Shanghai

In an exclusive press conference on Monday (19th September) held at Shanghai's Garden Hotel, the President of the Federation Internationale de L'Automobile (FIA), Max Mosley, looked back on the success of last years inaugural Chinese Grand Prix...

In an exclusive press conference on Monday (19th September) held at Shanghai's Garden Hotel, the President of the Federation Internationale de L'Automobile (FIA), Max Mosley, looked back on the success of last years inaugural Chinese Grand Prix and expressed his thoughts on this year's season finale.

China's top sport and entertainment media turned out in force to hear Mosley talk about the past year, the forthcoming race and answer questions on everything from the Indianapolis/Michelin incident to the rumours surrounding the creation of a rival championship.

When questioned about his thoughts on the Shanghai International Circuit (SIC) and the forthcoming Chinese Grand Prix in October he commented: "The facility (SIC) is probably the best in the World, it is very difficult to see how what took place last year could be improved. Everyone was overwhelmed by the facility and we are very much looking forward to this year's event.

"I'm very impressed with the increased amount of motorsport taking place in China. Not just Formula One, China has a very successful Rally Championship. I think as a result of all this activity I think we will see a Chinese driver in the next five to ten years. I think China can look forward to a very successful future in motorsport."

During the press conference organised by SIC and the sport's governing body in China, FASC*, Mosley went on to discuss potential rule changes and tyre developments over the coming years answering every question fired at him.

Speaking about the issue of a breakaway championship he said: "It would involve a huge financial input - I can't see where that would come from. We have a significant number of teams already committed or on the verge of committing; I think it's unlikely that there will be a sufficient number of competitors to make it work.

"When you look at an event like the Olympics for example, there are many athletic meetings around the world involving a similar kind of activity but there is only one true Olympic Games. The same applies for Formula One. So in a nutshell, I don't think it will happen.

"We are going through an interesting time in Formula One with many changes underway. Whilst there is a certain amount of dissent amongst some teams, change is essential, costs have reached a point where it's (F1) no longer sustainable."

The Shanghai based circuit is a hive of activity as they prepare to host the second Grand Prix with many lessons learned from last year's race and the MotoGP early this year. Early indications continue to point towards a sell-out race as the FIA Formula One World Championship Series 2005 comes to a close.

*FASC - Federation of Automobile Sport China

-sic-

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Series Formula 1