Magnussen reveals "crazy" trek back to F1 pits after Brazilian GP

Kevin Magnussen has revealed his “crazy” experience of being forced to walk back to the pits among a mob of hyped Formula 1 fans after the Brazilian Grand Prix.

Magnussen reveals "crazy" trek back to F1 pits after Brazilian GP
Listen to this article

The Dane had been spun out of last weekend’s Interlagos race by Daniel Ricciardo on the opening lap, with his damaged Haas left stranded by the side of the track.

And while the medical car stopped to check on him and his McLaren rival, there was only enough space to take one of them back to the garages – and Ricciardo had quickly jumped in. That left Magnussen alone out on the track with no alternative way of getting back to the paddock.

After waiting for the race to finish, Magnussen said still nobody came to get him – so he had to make his own way back, which meant walking through the general spectator areas.

“It was crazy,” he said when asked by Motorsport.com about the events. “I don't know what went on, but it was the most dangerous thing I did all weekend, despite all the driving!

“For whatever reason, I didn't catch a ride back to the pits. Daniel took me out of the race and then jumped in the safety car and took my ride back to the pits. And then I was left at the side of the track the whole race. I can survive that, that's okay.

“Then, I've tried to speak to the marshals, but they didn't speak a word of English, none at all. After the race, I was kind of waiting for someone to come and pick me up or something, and the marshals started leaving. And then I was like, what do I do?”

Daniel Ricciardo, McLaren MCL36, Kevin Magnussen, Haas VF-22, crash out

Daniel Ricciardo, McLaren MCL36, Kevin Magnussen, Haas VF-22, crash out

Photo by: Andy Hone / Motorsport Images

Magnussen explained that he walked nearby to try to find a route back to the paddock area but got stuck at a fence, before some other marshals came to help him.

“I ended up by a fence that I couldn't really see a way around,” he said. “Of course, I could have walked the whole track and go around to the start finish, but there were all the fans.

“Then some of the marshals realised that I was in trouble and cut a hole in the fence and lifted me through, which was kind of sketchy.

“The marshals took good care of me [among the fans] but it could have been bad, I guess. I am glad I wasn't Lewis Hamilton at Zandvoort. That would have been really sketchy!”

Asked if Brazilian race organisers had given him an explanation about what happened, Magnussen said: “They apologised and stuff, but I mean, it's a pretty weird situation.

“Just come and pick me up: how hard can it be? It was surreal. I hope that doesn't happen again.”

Pole reflections

While Magnussen’s Brazilian Grand Prix ended in disappointment after his first lap exit, he says that it did not put a dampener on the joy he still takes from his shock pole for Saturday's sprint race.

“It was a very proud moment for us to get pole position for such a little small, privately-owned team, like Haas is,” he said. “It was really a proud moment. And I think it really lifted everyone up. It has showed that anything is possible in this sport.

“Although often it seems like it is impossible, it isn't. Moments like this is what makes it all worthwhile.”

He added that he can still see the positivity it has injected in Haas team members after a fairly tough few seasons.

“I think everyone loved it,” he said. “It was a real proud moment for the team.

“I can see everyone: when they're walking down the paddock, they look a little bigger, a little taller. And that's great.

“It's great to see and it's a memory that we will have in common always. And going into the end of the season like this, going into a winter with a huge high like that, it's worth a lot. So I'm really happy about that.”

Read Also:
shares
comments

Related video

De Vries' F1 move gives Formula E drivers "more credibility" - Dennis

Alonso reveals Vettel F1 tribute helmet for Abu Dhabi GP

Why Albon won't be "throwing around laptops" to gain a 2023 F1 edge

Why Albon won't be "throwing around laptops" to gain a 2023 F1 edge

Prime
Prime
Formula 1
Williams launch
Alex Kalinauckas

Why Albon won't be "throwing around laptops" to gain a 2023 F1 edge Why Albon won't be "throwing around laptops" to gain a 2023 F1 edge

The pioneering F1 car that preceded Lotus’s terminal decline

The pioneering F1 car that preceded Lotus’s terminal decline

Prime
Prime
Formula 1
GP Racing

Throwback: The 1987 Lotus 99T The pioneering F1 car that preceded Lotus’s terminal decline

How Tyrrell became a racing Rubik’s cube as it faded out of F1

How Tyrrell became a racing Rubik’s cube as it faded out of F1

Prime
Prime
Formula 1
GP Racing

The story of Ken Tyrrell's team How Tyrrell became a racing Rubik’s cube as it faded out of F1

Assessing Hamilton's remarkable decade as a Mercedes F1 driver

Assessing Hamilton's remarkable decade as a Mercedes F1 driver

Prime
Prime
Formula 1
Alex Kalinuackas

Assessing Hamilton's Mercedes stint Assessing Hamilton's remarkable decade as a Mercedes F1 driver

Why new-look Haas is a litmus test for Formula 1’s new era

Why new-look Haas is a litmus test for Formula 1’s new era

Prime
Prime
Formula 1
Jonathan Noble

Why new-look Haas is a litmus test Why new-look Haas is a litmus test for Formula 1’s new era

The Mercedes F1 pressure changes under 10 years of Toto Wolff

The Mercedes F1 pressure changes under 10 years of Toto Wolff

Prime
Prime
Formula 1
Alex Kalinauckas

Assessing Wolff's Mercedes influence The Mercedes F1 pressure changes under 10 years of Toto Wolff

The all-French F1 partnership that Ocon and Gasly hope to emulate

The all-French F1 partnership that Ocon and Gasly hope to emulate

Prime
Prime
Formula 1
GP Racing

The line-up Ocon, Gasly may emulate The all-French F1 partnership that Ocon and Gasly hope to emulate

Who were the fastest drivers in F1 2022?

Who were the fastest drivers in F1 2022?

Prime
Prime
Formula 1
GP Racing

Who were the fastest F1 drivers? Who were the fastest drivers in F1 2022?