Formula 1
Formula 1
30 Apr
-
03 May
FP1 in
70 days
07 May
-
10 May
FP1 in
77 days
21 May
-
24 May
FP1 in
90 days
R
Azerbaijan GP
04 Jun
-
07 Jun
FP1 in
105 days
11 Jun
-
14 Jun
FP1 in
112 days
25 Jun
-
28 Jun
FP1 in
126 days
02 Jul
-
05 Jul
FP1 in
133 days
16 Jul
-
19 Jul
FP1 in
147 days
R
Hungarian GP
30 Jul
-
02 Aug
FP1 in
161 days
27 Aug
-
30 Aug
FP1 in
189 days
03 Sep
-
06 Sep
FP1 in
196 days
R
Singapore GP
17 Sep
-
20 Sep
FP1 in
210 days
24 Sep
-
27 Sep
FP1 in
217 days
R
United States GP
22 Oct
-
25 Oct
FP1 in
245 days
29 Oct
-
01 Nov
FP1 in
253 days
R
Brazilian GP
12 Nov
-
15 Nov
FP1 in
266 days
R
Abu Dhabi GP
26 Nov
-
29 Nov
FP1 in
280 days

Halo "destroys" F1's push to be more popular - Lauda

shares
comments
Halo "destroys" F1's push to be more popular - Lauda
By:
Jul 21, 2017, 8:39 AM

The FIA's decision to impose the Halo in Formula 1 next year has "destroyed" a push to make the sport more popular, claims three-time world champion Niki Lauda.

Niki Lauda, Mercedes AMG F1 Non-Executive Chairman and Toto Wolff, Mercedes AMG F1 Director of Motorsport
Jolyon Palmer, Renault Sport F1 Team RS16 with a Halo cockpit cover
 Niki Lauda, Non-Executive Chairman, Mercedes AMG F1, talks to Nico Rosberg
Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari SF16-H with the Halo cockpit cover
Renault Sport F1 Team RS16 with a Halo cockpit cover
Sergio Perez, Sahara Force India F1 VJM09 with the Halo cockpit cover
Felipe Nasr, Sauber C35 with the Halo cockpit cover

This week's confirmation that the FIA would be imposing the Halo in 2018, despite only one team being in favour, has caused a huge backlash from fans and commentators.

Now Lauda, whose Mercedes team first developed the Halo concept, is angry about what has happened – as he thinks it would have been better to hold fire and perfect alternative solutions that were more appealing.

"We tested the Halo, the Red Bull Aeroscreen and the Shield as a cockpit protection – but none convinced 100 percent," Lauda told German publication Auto Motor und Sport.

"You have to make the right decision in such a situation. The Halo is the wrong one."

Lauda thinks that the timing of the FIA's decision is especially poor, because F1 had just embarked on an overhaul of regulations to make cars look better in a bid to attract new fans.

He views the arrival of a Halo as a backwards step.

"We are trying hard with faster cars and getting closer to the spectators to attract new fans to the sport. But this now is destroyed by an overreaction."

Lauda's belief is that F1 is already exceptionally safe, and that it would have been wiser to have waited to find a perfect solution than impose something that is not universally supported.

"The Halo destroys the DNA of an F1 car. The FIA has made F1 as safe as it gets. Also the danger of flying wheels is largely eliminated, because the wheels are always more firmly attached. The risk to the drivers has become minimal.

"There is 100 percent a better solution that the Halo. Otherwise we would not have tried three ideas.

"It would have been more sensible to go in the direction that if we find something that does not destroy the looks of the car, that it be introduced in 2019.

"It's as simple as that. There is no reason to do something we will regret later."

Next article
Verstappen doesn't take Vettel complaints "seriously" anymore

Previous article

Verstappen doesn't take Vettel complaints "seriously" anymore

Next article

Force India test reignites F1 dream for Lucas Auer

Force India test reignites F1 dream for Lucas Auer
Load comments

About this article

Series Formula 1
Author Jonathan Noble