Kvyat blames Magnussen for Spanish GP clash

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Kvyat blames Magnussen for Spanish GP clash
By: Lawrence Barretto
May 15, 2017, 1:20 PM

Daniil Kvyat said it was "clear-cut" that Kevin Magnussen was to blame for their collision in the Spanish Grand Prix, insisting the Haas Formula 1 driver drove into him.

Kevin Magnussen, Haas F1 Team VF-17, Daniil Kvyat, Scuderia Toro Rosso STR12
Daniil Kvyat, Scuderia Toro Rosso STR12, Fernando Alonso, McLaren MCL32
Pascal Wehrlein, Sauber C36, Carlos Sainz Jr., Scuderia Toro Rosso STR12, Kevin Magnussen, Haas F1 Team VF-17
Daniil Kvyat, Scuderia Toro Rosso STR12, Fernando Alonso, McLaren MCL32
Kevin Magnussen, Haas F1 Team VF-17, Romain Grosjean, Haas F1 Team VF-17

The Toro Rosso driver escaped damage when he had contact with Magnussen on the penultimate lap as they battled for ninth place, but the latter picked up a puncture that forced him to pit.

The incident went unpunished by the stewards, with Kvyat scoring points for the first time since the season opener in ninth and Magnussen dropping to 14th.

When asked by Motorsport.com for his view of the collision, Kvyat said: "He drove into me and got a puncture for himself. I was one car ahead and he just tried to get back the position and he drove into me. It was very clear-cut."

He added he doesn't "see any reason why I need to" talk to Magnussen about the incident.

Magnussen, whose teammate Romain Grosjean inherited 10th and the final point as a result of him dropping down the field, said: "There was some contact there with Kvyat.

"I would've been fine, but I got a puncture from the contact. It's annoying - we could've had the points with both cars, so it's pretty disappointing."

Haas team principal Gunther Steiner defended Magnussen, suggesting it was "just a racing accident".

He also praised the way the stewards handled the race, which featured several incidents but only one penalty - for Stoffel Vandoorne after his contact with Felipe Massa.

"I don't want to comment on [the Vandoorne penalty] but the other ones, I think they did the right decision," he said. "We want to see racing - it's getting decided on the track. Sometimes one is happy, the other is unhappy - that's racing."

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