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Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis
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Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis

Italian GP: Latest F1 tech updates, straight from pitlane

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Italian GP: Latest F1 tech updates, straight from pitlane
By:
Co-author: Matthew Somerfield
Sep 5, 2019, 10:27 PM

Giorgio Piola and Sutton Images bring you the Formula 1 technical updates on show in the Monza pitlane at the Italian Grand Prix, giving insight into the relentless development undertaken by the teams in pursuit of more performance.

Click on the arrows to cycle through the images below...

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Ferrari SF90 rear wing

Ferrari SF90 rear wing
1/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari’s low downforce rear wing is a fairly simple affair with a low angle of attack to reduce drag. Also note the sculpted upper edge of the mainplane, which is pared back in the central portion to undoubtedly alter the tip vortex and with it the drag being created.

Red Bull Racing RB15

Red Bull Racing RB15
2/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Red Bull’s RB15 is sporting a very low downforce rear wing design as it looks to offset any power unit disadvantages it may have against rivals.

Renault F1 Team R.S.19 rear wing

Renault F1 Team R.S.19 rear wing
3/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Here’s Renault’s low downforce effort, designed to both reduce drag for the long straights but also balance the car when needed.

Haas F1 Team VF-19 rear wing detail

Haas F1 Team VF-19 rear wing detail
4/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Haas will look at using a low downforce rear wing at Monza, a design which features far less inclination of the flap and a curvature on the trailing edge which meets with the slot gap separators.

Mercedes AMG F1 W10 front wing

Mercedes AMG F1 W10 front wing
5/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

This image may make it look like Mercedes is planning on running a very low downforce front wing assembly, with just three elements, but the team has a new setup arriving at the track for Free Practice.

Renault F1 Team R.S.19 front wing detail

Renault F1 Team R.S.19 front wing detail
6/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Renault’s Monza-spec front wing is typical low downforce fare, with a large portion of the inboard section of the upper flap trimmed back.

Front wing of Haas F1 Team VF-19

Front wing of Haas F1 Team VF-19
7/18

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Motorsport Images

Haas has opted for their usual ‘dipped in the middle’ approach, as it looks to compromise on some downforce and reduce drag.

Haas F1 Team VF-19 front wing detail

Haas F1 Team VF-19 front wing detail
8/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

A close up of the Haas wings, note how there’s no adjuster fitted to the lower of these two wings.

Toro Rosso STR14 front wing

Toro Rosso STR14 front wing
9/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Toro Rosso has shown its hand already, as the front wing has a redesigned flap stack, with all three tips of the upper flaps at the inboard end, altered to affect the vorticity of the Y250 airflow. This is married to some modifications to the mainplane below, which will also have a bearing on the potency of the Y250 vortex. Meanwhile, the upper flap has been cut back significantly to help boost straightline speed.

Renault F1 Team R.S.19 rear detail

Renault F1 Team R.S.19 rear detail
10/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

A look inside the Renault garage gives us a great view of the power unit and its installation, note how the wastegates pipework has been crushed and tapers to coincide with the shape of the crash structure.

Red Bull Racing RB15 rear detail

Red Bull Racing RB15 rear detail
11/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

This shot of the Red Bull RB15 shows how the team has opted to straddle the power unit with some of the ancillary components.

Toro Rosso STR14 rear detail

Toro Rosso STR14 rear detail
12/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Likewise, its sister team, who had a head start in its working relationship with Honda, have also committed to placing some of the ancillary components over the back of their power unit.

Front wing of Racing Point RP19

Front wing of Racing Point RP19
13/18

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Motorsport Images

Racing Point introduced a new nose solution in Belgium (lower) but still has the old specification on site as an option.

Front wing of Racing Point RP19

Front wing of Racing Point RP19
14/18

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Motorsport Images

It could be argued that the new solution is actually more simplistic, but that’s not always a bad thing. The newer solution has a thumb-style tip to comply with the nose height regulations and features a set of elongated wing pillars, furnished with three slots.

Renault F1 Team R.S.19 front detail

Renault F1 Team R.S.19 front detail
15/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

A look at the inner workings of Renault’s front suspension, steering rack and brake cylinder placement.

Renault F1 Team R.S.19 rim detail

Renault F1 Team R.S.19 rim detail
16/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

A look inside Renault’s wheel rim, note the lug nuts used to locate the rim on the axle.

Red Bull Racing RB15 front detail

Red Bull Racing RB15 front detail
17/18

Photo by: Alessio Morgese

There’s plenty to talk about in this image of the Red Bull RB15 - from the kiel probe array that’s mounted in the airbox for FP1, to the closed off brake drums, to the exposed detail of the front suspensions heave element, to the great view we have of the lower part of the bargeboards, to the extremely skinny rear wing in the background.

Toro Rosso STR14 front wing

Toro Rosso STR14 front wing
18/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

A comparison of the two front wing specifications on offer at Toro Rosso - the lower of the two being the Monza spec.

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About this article

Series Formula 1
Event Italian GP
Author Giorgio Piola