Lauda's Liberty criticisms "unfounded, unfair" - Horner

shares
comments
Lauda's Liberty criticisms
Jonathan Noble
By: Jonathan Noble
Nov 14, 2017, 3:06 PM

Red Bull boss Christian Horner thinks Niki Lauda has been "unfair" in his criticisms of Liberty Media, amid ongoing disagreements about the future direction of Formula 1.

Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari SF70H, Valtteri Bottas, Mercedes AMG F1 W08, Kimi Raikkonen, Ferrari SF70H, Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB13, Fernando Alonso, McLaren MCL32, the rest of the field at the start
Chase Carey, Chairman, Formula One, talks with Christian Horner, Team Principal, Red Bull Racing
Niki Lauda, Mercedes AMG F1 Non-Executive Chairman
Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari SF70H and Valtteri Bottas, Mercedes-Benz F1 W08 battle for the lead at the start of the race
Christian Horner, Team Principal, Red Bull Racing, Bernie Ecclestone, Chairman Emeritus of Formula 1
Christian Horner, Red Bull Racing Team Principal and Lawrence Stroll
Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari SF70H, Valtteri Bottas, Mercedes AMG F1 W08, Kimi Raikkonen, Ferrari SF70H, Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB13, the rest of the field at the start

Lauda hit out at Liberty over the Brazilian GP weekend claiming he was "worried" for the sport's future because he had seen no evidence that the new owners were putting in place what F1 needed to become more successful.

His remarks came against the backdrop of a dispute over future engine rules, and concerns from some teams about an unprecedented fall in commercial rights income for the sport.

But although Lauda is sceptical about Liberty, Horner has defended the American media giants and says he is fully behind the vision it is laying out for F1.

"I think Niki's comments were... a little unfounded, unfair," said Horner, when asked by Motorsport.com about whether he agreed with Lauda's concerns.

"For once, Formula 1, it's recruited some specialists in Ross Brawn and the team he's put together. And it's doing proper analysis.

"Too many times there's been decisions made from the hip. And perhaps it's not going fast enough for Niki's liking, but I think the approach they are taking is the right approach.

"I think it's unfair to be giving them a hard time, when they're only nine months in and actually haven't presented their complete plan yet.

"It's inevitable that they're going to take time to understand the business, do the analysis, and then present what the future of Formula 1 is going to look like."

The drop in prize money in the last quarter, with it having fallen to $273 million (USD), which is 13 percent lower than last year when it came in at $316 million, has alarmed some team chiefs.

But with the decrease being the result of investments that Liberty has made to help improve F1, Horner says teams need to be patient for bigger benefits in the future.

"I think that would have been the effect whether Liberty would've been there or not," he said about the prize money drop.

"It's circumstances. Obviously they're building an infrastructure, they're investing in the business, it's just a different model to what it used to be It used to be a small structure with Bernie and a couple of aides.

"Now, they've put a marketing team together, they've put a proper business structure behind it - which is of course going to incur cost.

"But if you don't speculate and invest in the business, you're not going to accumulate. And the world is moving on quickly, and it's important that Formula 1 put that structure in place.

"So... Red Bull does not have any issues with what they're doing, their approach. And we're watching with interest to see what their plans are for 2021 onwards."

Next Formula 1 article
Tech analysis: The 2018 F1 season starts here

Previous article

Tech analysis: The 2018 F1 season starts here

Next article

Why F1 can't turn its back on manufacturers

Why F1 can't turn its back on manufacturers
Load comments

About this article

Series Formula 1
Teams Red Bull Racing Shop Now
Author Jonathan Noble
Article type Breaking news