Horner tells Wolff "I'd keep my mouth shut" over flexi-wings

Christian Horner says he would "keep my mouth shut" over Formula 1's flexi-wing saga if he were Mercedes, saying the team risks opening a can of worms.

Horner tells Wolff "I'd keep my mouth shut" over flexi-wings

F1 arrived in Baku for the Azerbaijan Grand Prix with protests looming over the flexibility of teams' rear wings ahead of new rigidity tests being introduced from the next race in France onwards.

Mercedes F1 boss Toto Wolff warned there could be a "very messy" situation in Baku if the FIA did not provide clarification on the matter, indicating teams may look to lodge a protest. The FIA has taken steps to police the matter in Baku by telling teams to add yellow locator dots to their rear wings, allowing officials to check how much they are flexing at high speed.

When shown footage by Sky Sports F1 of Mercedes' rear wing appearing to show some flexibility during practice on Friday in Azerbaijan, Horner said it "if anything, around here, looks at bit worse than ours".

Horner added: "I'd be more interested to see the front of the cars than the rear of the cars.

"So you're opening a complete can of worms, and that is why there are tests, there are stringent tests in place, that the cars are designed to comply with."

Read Also:

Both Red Bull team principal Horner and team advisor Helmut Marko have aired concerns over the flexibility of Mercedes' front wing at recent races, suggesting previously that a counter-protest could be lodged should Mercedes take action.

Horner felt that any concerns over the flexibility of the rear wings would also have to be applied to other parts of the car, bringing Mercedes' front wing into question.

"A lot of noise has been made about the rear wing, and a lot of revisions have had to be made," Horner said. "So if you're picking on one end of the car, you have to look at the other. You can't look at one part in isolation and say that set of rules only applies to that element on that car.

"You have to look at all areas. Sometimes, you have to be a little bit careful what you wish for."

Horner noted when shown a clip of the Mercedes front wing that "you can see the sponsorship on the front wing, and then it disappears as he comes into a braking area."

"Maybe that's what it's for, it's to expose the new sponsor on the front wing," Horner joked.

Asked what he would do if he were in Mercedes' shoes, Horner replied: "I think if I was Toto with the front wing he's got on his car, I'd keep my mouth shut."

A number of teams have already acknowledged they have been exploiting the loophole in the regulations relating to their rear wings, including Ferrari and Alfa Romeo.

Horner felt it was only natural that teams would push the limits of the technical regulations where they could.

"You've got some very bright technicians designing components to comply with the rules," Horner said. "That's their job, that's what we pay them for, that's what Formula 1 is all about, that engineering ingenuity. If we want standard cars, then we'd be Formula 2.

"I think that's part of what the competition in this sport is, pushing the boundaries. That's what Formula 1 is all about.

"You've got to be legal, you've got to be within the rules, but you've got to push those boundaries. That's what we, like every other team in the pitlane, does."

shares
comments

Related video

Singapore GP called off due to COVID restrictions

Previous article

Singapore GP called off due to COVID restrictions

Next article

Perez says he "finally understands" Red Bull's F1 car

Perez says he "finally understands" Red Bull's F1 car
Load comments
The squandered potential of a 70s F1 underdog Prime

The squandered potential of a 70s F1 underdog

A podium finisher in its first outing but then never again, the BRM P201 was a classic case of an opportunity squandered by disorganisation and complacency, says Stuart Codling.

The other notable Monza escape that F1 should learn from Prime

The other notable Monza escape that F1 should learn from

OPINION: The headlines were dominated by the Italian Grand Prix clash between Max Verstappen and Lewis Hamilton, who had the halo to thank for avoiding potentially serious injury. But two days earlier, Formula 1 had a lucky escape with a Monza pitlane incident that could also have had grave consequences.

Formula 1
Sep 17, 2021
How Monza only added more questions to F1's sprint race conundrum Prime

How Monza only added more questions to F1's sprint race conundrum

With two sprint races under its belt, Formula 1 must now consider its options for them going forward. While they've helped deliver exciting racing on Sundays, the sprints themselves have been somewhat lacking - creating yet another conundrum for F1 to solve...

Formula 1
Sep 16, 2021
Who should Alfa Romeo sign for 2022's F1 season? Prime

Who should Alfa Romeo sign for 2022's F1 season?

OPINION: With Valtteri Bottas already signed up for 2022, all eyes are on the race for the second seat at Alfa Romeo next year. Antonio Giovinazzi is the current incumbent, but faces a tough competition from appealing short and long-term prospects

Formula 1
Sep 15, 2021
The "forced break" that was key to Ricciardo's Monza excellence Prime

The "forced break" that was key to Ricciardo's Monza excellence

OPINION: Daniel Ricciardo has long been considered one of Formula 1's elite drivers. But his struggles at McLaren since switching from Renault for 2021 have been painful to watch at times. Yet he's recovered to banish those memories with a famous Monza win – built on a critically important foundation

Formula 1
Sep 14, 2021
Italian Grand Prix driver ratings Prime

Italian Grand Prix driver ratings

Two drivers produced faultless performances as, for the second year in a row, Monza threw up an unpredictable result that left many to rue what might have been

Formula 1
Sep 13, 2021
Why Ricciardo would have won without Verstappen/Hamilton crash Prime

Why Ricciardo would have won without Verstappen/Hamilton crash

The clash between Max Verstappen and Lewis Hamilton was the major flashpoint the 2021 Italian Grand Prix will be remembered for. Yet by this point, race leader Daniel Ricciardo had already done the hard work that would put him in position to end his and McLaren's lengthy win droughts, on a memorable afternoon in Monza

Formula 1
Sep 13, 2021
Why Italian GP success is on for McLaren even if Verstappen dominates Prime

Why Italian GP success is on for McLaren even if Verstappen dominates

For the second time in 2021, McLaren will line up for the start of a grand prix from the first row. It knows it has the chance of "glory" if things go well for Daniel Ricciardo and Lando Norris at the start of the 2021 Italian Grand Prix, but even if they just maintain their grid positions, signs from the rest of the Monza weekend suggest success is very possible for Formula 1's other orange army

Formula 1
Sep 12, 2021