Formula 1
27 Jun
-
30 Jun
Event finished
11 Jul
-
14 Jul
Event finished
25 Jul
-
28 Jul
Event finished
01 Aug
-
04 Aug
Event finished
29 Aug
-
01 Sep
FP1 in
8 days
05 Sep
-
08 Sep
FP1 in
15 days
R
Singapore GP
19 Sep
-
22 Sep
FP1 in
29 days
26 Sep
-
29 Sep
FP1 in
36 days
10 Oct
-
13 Oct
FP1 in
50 days
24 Oct
-
27 Oct
FP1 in
64 days
R
United States GP
31 Oct
-
03 Nov
FP1 in
71 days
R
Brazilian GP
14 Nov
-
17 Nov
FP1 in
85 days
R
Abu Dhabi GP
28 Nov
-
01 Dec
FP1 in
99 days
Motorsport Blog
Topic

Motorsport Blog

Have your say: New F1 rules have split the paddock but will they improve the racing?

shares
comments
Have your say: New F1 rules have split the paddock but will they improve the racing?
Mar 17, 2016, 6:43 PM

Formula 1 has introduced a number of new rules ahead of the 2016 season that have been designed to mix up the grid and spice up the racing.

Formula 1 has introduced a number of new rules ahead of the 2016 season that have been designed to mix up the grid and spice up the racing.

The drivers now have a choice between three compounds of Pirelli rubber and will compete in a new elimination qualifying session before coping with severe restrictions on what can be discussed via the team radio during the race.

These changes come into play at this weekend’s Australian Grand Prix and the new rules have divided opinion throughout the F1 paddock.

Nico Hulkenberg

Radio restrictions

When asked about the new radio rules, which limit what the teams can tell their racers and are aimed at giving more control back to the drivers, Force India’s Nico Hulkenberg reckons the changes will make the races more exciting.

He said: “The new rules sound challenging and exciting. It’s more responsibility for the driver, we have to manage a lot more and there are some things that do translate into performance so it is interesting.

“It’s definitely a massive challenge to do that in the heat of the race while you’re fighting with the tyres and [other] cars and having to manage other things. [It’s] a huge challenge but one that I’m really looking forward too.”

When asked if he saw the radio ban as an advantage, Hulkenberg explained that while he hopes to gain from of the changes, he believes all the teams will quickly adapt to the situation before too long.

Nico Hulkenberg

He said: “I hope [it will be an advantage]. We’ll really have to do it [first] and see how it works but as drivers we have to be aware and understand everything.

“The first couple of races will probably be a learning curve for everyone and then things will settle down a bit in the later stages of the season.”

McLaren’s Fernando Alonso believes that the new radio rules will actually give the drivers less freedom than they previously had when it comes to in-race strategy decisions.

He said: “Honestly, we need to wait and see a couple of races to really make a conclusion on these radio limitations. I don't want to be negative on any of the changes, but I honestly think that this will do the opposite probably.

 Fernando Alonso

"The aim is to give the driver more freedom, or more input in terms of strategy or changes in the car, or preparation. I think now we will not have any input in anything we do – because we have not the possibility to have that conversation with the team or have that decision on the radio.

"So we will stick to the programme and what we decide two hours before the race in the strategy meeting and we have to follow that.

"I don't think it is going change anything, but if it does change it will be even less possibility for a driver because we are not able to chat [about] that thing."

Jenson Button

Alonso’s teammate, Jenson Button reckons that although the changes may possibly shake up the racing, the 2009 world champion feels the clampdown on radio advice would be impossible to police.

He said: "It definitely will add something. It's just policing it is pretty much impossible. That's the only thing.

"[Race control] are not going to listen to every single radio [message], every single broadcast every time we use it. It's difficult to police really."

Sebastian Vettel

Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel described the radio ban as “childish” and questioned if the rule change will have the desired effect of improving the racing.

He said: “There is a little bit more for the driver to do but I think some of the restrictions are a bit childish. I guess so people had some really clever thoughts and I don’t know if we’ll achieve what it is supposed to but it will be a bit more quiet.

“I’m trying to be amongst the best but I think the driver is left alone with a lot of stuff that is maybe too complicated to explain, stuff that he shouldn’t really [have to] think of and now has to. But [that’s] fine and eventually we do it.

Elimination qualifying

The new qualifying regulations have also split opinions amongst the drivers.

Sebastian Vettel

Vettel, who explained that he was not happy with the new system, said that while there may be some surprising results early on, believes the teams will quickly adopt the same protocols.

He said: “I am hoping that the quickest [driver] comes out on top because I think that is the name of the game. But I think it will take some getting used to so here and there, there might a surprise, but after a while everybody knows what [they’re] doing or what is important at the time.

“I don’t expect much change but I am still not in favour of the new qualifying. But that is what we’ll have so we’ll have to get on with it.

Sergio Perez

Sergio Perez reckons that the new system will not build to a crescendo as the old knockout sessions previously did, and the Force India driver fears the end of Q3 will not be exciting as the competitors will not have many tyres left by that stage.

He said: "I think, in Q3, you're [going to] have the last three minutes probably a bit more boring than in the past, because people are pushed to go early.

"For example, for us, if we're into Q3, we're [going to] be just with a single set of tyres so we'll have to go early. We will not have the usual stuff from the past, when you used to see two or three cars right at the last minute.

"I hope [it doesn't happen], but I think you're [going to] lose a bit of that in Q3, which was the most interesting session for the fans."

Daniel Ricciardo

But Red Bull’s Daniel Ricciardo reckons the new qualifying system will create more excitement as it puts more pressure on the teams to get their drivers in position to avoid elimination.

He said: “[The] new quali system should be pretty cool. I think it will create a bit more pressure on not only the drivers but the teams to send us out on the track at the right time [to] make sure we get a lap in before the elimination. Hopefully it creates even more excitement.”

Australian F1 Grand Prix

Have your say:

What do you make of the new rules on team radio and qualifying? Take our poll ahead of the Melbourne race and then have your say in a subsequent vote next week once the regulation changes have been seen in action.

Do you think the new qualifying format and radio rules will improve F1?

Don’t forget to leave your thoughts on the upcoming race and the new rules in the comment section below or head over to the JAonF1 Facebook page for more discussion.
Next article
Aston Martin wants hyper-car to be faster than F1 cars

Previous article

Aston Martin wants hyper-car to be faster than F1 cars

Next article

Pirelli confident it can deliver on 2017 F1 tyre demands

Pirelli confident it can deliver on 2017 F1 tyre demands
Load comments

About this article

Series Formula 1
Drivers Nico Hulkenberg Shop Now , Sergio Perez Shop Now