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Gone in two seconds: new Red Bull documentary charts the evolution of F1 pitstops

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Gone in two seconds: new Red Bull documentary charts the evolution of F1 pitstops
Oct 26, 2016, 7:56 AM

Red Bull has a produced a documentary looking at the history of Formula 1 pitstops to coincide with the third anniversary of its sub-two second sto...

Red Bull has a produced a documentary looking at the history of Formula 1 pitstops to coincide with the third anniversary of its sub-two second stop at the 2013 US Grand Prix.

The Milton Keynes-based squad serviced Mark Webber’s RB9 In 1.923s to set a new world record. At the 2016 European Grand Prix, Williams officially equalled that record by turning around Felipe Massa in 1.92s, although the team’s telemetry data reportedly recorded the stop as taking just 1.89s.

The documentary, titled ‘The History of the Pit Stop: Gone in 2 Seconds’, is presented by former F1 driver David Coulthard and it covers the evolution of pitstops from the very start of the world championship up to the rapid wheel changes we see in modern F1.

Felipe Massa

Coulthard describes the changes from the abandoned pit complex and grandstands at the former Reims circuit in North East France and speaks to former F1 drivers John Surtees, Gerhard Berger, Jos Verstappen and Webber about their different experiences in the pitlane.

The documentary also features an extended focus on Gordon Murray and the 1980s Brabham squad, which brought in-race refuelling back to F1 with the BT50 – although the practice was subsequently banned in 1984 before being reintroduced between 1994 and 2010.

Murray and his team, which was owned at the time by future F1 boss Bernie Ecclestone, engineered a way to save time over the course of a Grand Prix by refuelling the BT50 using adapted beer barrels and wardrobe-like structures heated with fans to keep the tyres warm.

Gordon Murray Bernie Ecclestone

“I used to read the rule book to death and try to find a loophole, a way around the regs for that sort of unfair advantage, if you like,” says Murray.

“I was thinking about the weight, I was always interested in weight saving. One pound of weight equated to exactly one hundredth of a second a lap and that was pretty constant. It didn’t take long to just to do the mathematics and think ‘well hold on a minute, the fuel is a huge percentage of the car weight’.

“So if you could halve that weight and go X many seconds a lap quicker, if you had a really quick, efficient pitstop you could stop halfway through the race and then win the race just on the reduced weight.”

https://twitter.com/F1/status/788761728305594368

Gone in 2 Seconds will be available on demand at www.redbull.tv

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Series Formula 1
Teams Red Bull Racing Shop Now , Williams