Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis

Gallery: Key F1 tech spy shots at Bahrain GP

43,441 views

Giorgio Piola gets under the skin of the F1 tech war in the Sakhir paddock.

Mercedes AMG F1 W08, engine cover

Mercedes AMG F1 W08, engine cover
1/43

Mercedes' ‘Fimney’ shark fin and cooling chimney, which allows hot air a route by which to escape from the car and reduces the amount of apertures that need to be opened up at the rear of the W08.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 front wing detail

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 front wing detail
2/43

A great shot of the Mercedes front wing from behind shows the positioning of strakes and how they help in the operation of the wing

Photo by: Sutton Images

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 rear wing

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 rear wing
3/43

There's plenty of detail to look at at the rear end of the W08, especially the diffuser, which has been increased in volume for 2017 as per the new regulations.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 sidepod detail

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 sidepod detail
4/43

The Mercedes floor slot viewed from the front.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Mercedes mechanics making adjustments to brakes on the W08

Mercedes mechanics making adjustments to brakes on the W08
5/43

Photo by: Sutton Images

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 front brake duct detail

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 front brake duct detail
6/43

A view of the displaced upper wishbone on the W08, enabled by the use of the upright ‘horn’. You’ll also note various surface geometries that tease the airflow as it passes around the brake duct, shaping the wake generated by the front tyre.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 steering wheel

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 steering wheel
7/43

A peek into the W08’s cockpit and a fantastic view of the steering wheel, with its numerous buttons and rotaries which control all of the power unit settings.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 screen detail

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 screen detail
8/43

The serrated windscreen was used primarily Nico Rosberg over the last few seasons at Mercedes - both both of the German team's drivers are using it this season. The windscreen limits the amount of buffer on the driver's helmet but can also be used as a tool to improve aero and cooling. The designers take into account the design of the driver's helmet when shaping the windscreen in order that the air is displaced around it more efficiently while being pushed into the airbox's path.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 aero detail

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 aero detail
9/43

A detailed presentation of the chassis horn used by Mercedes to improve flow around the sidepods and into the sidepod inlet. Note the cutouts etched into the leading edge in order to improve how the airflow circulates around it.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 aero detail

Mercedes AMG F1 W08 aero detail
10/43

The 2017 version of the ‘Bat-wing’, mounted astride the ride height sensor, features a much more complicated winged section, with a Z shaping. The pre-bargeboard, which is broken up into three sections, is also mounted on three protruding strakes, which look very similar to the W-floor used last season.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Ferrari SF70H bodywork detail

Ferrari SF70H bodywork detail
11/43

Ferrari has reacted to the warmer climes of Bahrain by expanding its cooling outlets alongside the cockpit, with several more fins used to control the heat as it escapes. These fins are furnished with notches in order that they change the shape of the rejected hot air as it mixes with the airflow passing over the sidepod.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari SF70H front wing detail

Ferrari SF70H front wing detail
12/43

Ferrari’s new front wing has several new features, including a full length slot in the mainplane, revised flaps and a more pronounced arch at the outer section.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari SF70H triangular splitter extensions

Ferrari SF70H triangular splitter extensions
13/43

The triangular floor section used ahead of the main floor on the SF70H in order to comply with the regulations features a fully enclosed hole (arrowed), moving airflow from the underside of the surface into the flow stream that moves around the sidepods undercut.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari SF70H sidepod detail

Ferrari SF70H sidepod detail
14/43

The much-talked about Ferrari floor fin is not a fully-enclosed hole, as is now allowed but a slot that perforates the edge of the car's floor. It's been a talking point as footage from the last few GPs has shown the fin fluttering, leading to a question mark over whether it be deemed too flexible.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari SF70H floor detail

Ferrari SF70H floor detail
15/43

The mid-section of Ferrari’s floor has a pronounced step, which seemingly covers the conduit that was previously more exposed during the pre-season tests. It’s understood this has been done to add rigidity and offer a more consistent aerodynamic surface.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari SF70H detail

Ferrari SF70H detail
16/43

Ferrari’s power unit and sidepod internal exposed. Note how the team continues to use the V configuration of radiators, as it had done in 2016.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari mechanics make adjustments to the SF70H's front suspension

Ferrari mechanics make adjustments to the SF70H's front suspension
17/43

Photo by: Sutton Images

Ferrari SF70H rear wing aero detail

Ferrari SF70H rear wing aero detail
18/43

The rear end of the SF70H is complemented by a monkey seat, while the twin rear wing mounting pillars have gold leaf applied in order to reflect the heat being generated by the exhaust.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Ferrari SF70H steering wheel

Ferrari SF70H steering wheel
19/43

Photo by: Sutton Images

Ferrari SF70H steering wheel

Ferrari SF70H steering wheel
20/43

Photo by: Sutton Images

Ferrari SF70H rear floor detail

Ferrari SF70H rear floor detail
21/43

Ferrari’s floor ahead of the rear wheel is supplemented by three L-shaped slots in order to deal with the issue of tyre squirt - a phenomenon whereby airflow is spilled off the rear tyre and pushed laterally into the diffuser, robbing it of consistency.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Ferrari SF70H aero detail

Ferrari SF70H aero detail
22/43

The overlapping turning vanes utilised by Ferrari in 2017, the forwardmost of which is connected to the side of the nose, while the rearward one is connected to the underside of the chassis.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Ferrari SF70H exhaust

Ferrari SF70H exhaust
23/43

A more detailed view of the rear wing mounting pylons, which have gold leaf applied in order to reflect the heat generated by the exhaust which exits between them.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Red Bull Racing RB13 with aero sensor

Red Bull Racing RB13 with aero sensor
24/43

Red Bull mounted a large kiel probe array at the rear of the sidepods during free practice so as to collect data on how the air is moving down and around the car.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Red Bull Racing RB13 rear detail

Red Bull Racing RB13 rear detail
25/43

The RB13 with the sidepod and engine cover off exposes the detail of the Renault power unit and the ancillary components.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Red Bull Racing RB13 chassis detail

Red Bull Racing RB13 chassis detail
26/43

The front of the RB13’s chassis is cutaway, much like last year, in order to improve access and installation of the suspension components.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Red Bull Racing mechanic with Red Bull Racing RB13 front wing

Red Bull Racing mechanic with Red Bull Racing RB13 front wing
27/43

A mechanic eagerly awaits one of his drivers to practice a nose chance. Note the rearward-facing slot at the base of the nose's ‘thumb’ extension, which mirrors what is seen at the front. Also note the small slots in the base of the two penultimate flaps before they start arching outward.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Red Bull Racing RB13 front suspension and aero paint

Red Bull Racing RB13 front suspension and aero paint
28/43

Flo-viz paint applied to the leading edge of the brake duct and suspension elements so that the team can investigate whether the parts are operating as expected.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB13

Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB13
29/43

Flo-viz paint that’s been applied to the leading edge of the brake duct and suspension elements has splattered on the bargeboards of the car. The team also painted some flo-viz on the sidepods to check they’re operating as expected.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Force India VJM10 front wing detail

Force India VJM10 front wing detail
30/43

This shot of the front wing shows the level of detail present on the VJM10. Two distinctly different canards are hung from the endplate looking to set up airflow structures that'll help the airflow across the front face and around the tyre.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Force India VJM10 bargeboard detail

Force India VJM10 bargeboard detail
31/43

Force India's bargeboards now feature nine serrations in the upper surface rather than the previous four (red arrows) and the pre-bargeboard (white arrows) has been lengthened extensively. The airflow conditioner that ordinarily wraps around the front face of the sidepod has been curtailed too, replaced by a stubbier appendage that meets with a vortex generator just a few inches from the sidepod's shoulder, framing the airflow around that corner.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Sergio Perez, Force India VJM10

Sergio Perez, Force India VJM10
32/43

Flo-viz paint applied to the bargeboards, floor and sidepods of the VJM10.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Force India VJM10 front wing detail

Force India VJM10 front wing detail
33/43

A rare look at the underside of the Force India's front wing.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Force India VJM10 front suspension and chassis detail

Force India VJM10 front suspension and chassis detail
34/43

The front end of the Force India chassis has been cut away in order to improve accessibility and packaging of the ‘heave’, or third suspension element.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Force India VJM10 front brake and wheel hub detail

Force India VJM10 front brake and wheel hub detail
35/43

Note the use of a brake disc with five drill holes across the face.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Scuderia Toro Rosso STR12 bodywork detail

Scuderia Toro Rosso STR12 bodywork detail
36/43

The STR12’s longitudinal floor slot takes advantage of the regulation changes that now allow fully enclosed holes 100mm from the floor's edge.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Haas F1 Team VF-17 front wing detail

Haas F1 Team VF-17 front wing detail
37/43

This is the front wing specification used by Haas in China - note the upper flap configuration features two tall chord flaps.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Haas F1 Team VF-17 front wing detail

Haas F1 Team VF-17 front wing detail
38/43

For the front wing trialled in Bahrain, there's a new upper flap arrangement, with three shorter chord flaps occupying the same space as the two previously used.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Haas F1 Team VF-17 floor detail

Haas F1 Team VF-17 floor detail
39/43

A look at the detached floor scroll employed by Haas, which allows air to move from one to surface to the other.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Haas F1 Team VF-17 front suspension detail

Haas F1 Team VF-17 front suspension detail
40/43

The VF17’s front suspension has commonality with Ferrari - the team from which Haas purchases its components.

Photo by: Sutton Images

McLaren MCL32 rear detail

McLaren MCL32 rear detail
41/43

The stripped-down MCL32 of Stoffel Vandoorne gives us a window into the layout of the Honda power unit and ancillary components. You can see the various radiators stacked within the sidepod and numerous pipes fed down from the airbox to the engine and oil coolers.

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Fernando Alonso, McLaren MCL32

Fernando Alonso, McLaren MCL32
42/43

Flo-viz paint was applied to the MCL32 during free practice.

Photo by: Sutton Images

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 ront brake and wheel hub and sensor detail

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 ront brake and wheel hub and sensor detail
43/43

Renault placed a kiel probe array behind the front tyre during free practice in order to gain data on the tyre's behaviour as it deforms.

Photo by: Sutton Images
Write a comment
Show comments
About this article
Series Formula 1
Event Bahrain GP
Track Bahrain International Circuit
Article type Analysis
Topic Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis