Gallery: Key F1 tech shots at the Brazilian GP

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Gallery: Key F1 tech shots at the Brazilian GP
Matt Somerfield
By: Matt Somerfield
Nov 10, 2017, 3:08 PM

A selection of the best technical images from Interlagos courtesy of Giorgio Piola, Sutton Images and LAT Images.

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Ferrari SF70H front wing detail

Ferrari SF70H front wing detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

A great shot of the newer specification front wing from beneath shows the level of detail that goes into guiding the airflow to improve the pressure field. The shape and thickness of the under-wing strakes change in accordance with the shape of the mainplane they’re connected to and in line with the transition of the slot in front of the outer three.

Ferrari SF70H front wing detail

Ferrari SF70H front wing detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

Head-on shot of the SF70H’s front wing, with the newest specification introduced in Austin, featuring several revisions, including a change to the footplate, endplate and the slots in the mainplane.

Williams FW40 front wing detail

Williams FW40 front wing detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

A development front wing for Williams, with the base position of the ‘r’ cascade moved back. The thickness of the second and third elements of the mainplane have also been increased.

Ferrari SF70H front wing detail

Ferrari SF70H front wing detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

Another shot of the SF70H’s front wing from beneath. A wider angle allows us to see under the nose too, where an optical ride height sensor is being employed for practice.

Haas F1 Team VF-17 nose and front wing detail

Haas F1 Team VF-17 nose and front wing detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

The newest specification of front wing employed by Haas this season, complete with wedge-shaped flap tips.

Scuderia Toro Rosso STR12 front wing detail

Scuderia Toro Rosso STR12 front wing detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

It's worth noting that Toro Rosso introduced the slot in the upper mainplane section near the Y250 section quite early in the season, something since copied by McLaren.

Sahara Force India VJM10 in the garage

Sahara Force India VJM10 in the garage
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

The VJM10 with very little bodywork or the floor attached exposes numerous details about cooling and sidepod and power unit packaging.

Sahara Force India VJM10 front wing detail

Sahara Force India VJM10 front wing detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

The close-up of the VJM10’s front wing shows the level of complexity involved in shaping the airflow ahead of the front tyre. The designers have completely compartmentalised the outer section, creating an exaggerated tunnel in order to deal with tyre wake. Note that none of the outer sections of the wing have been painted either.

Williams FW40 nose and front wings

Williams FW40 nose and front wings
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

Both front wing specifications available to the Williams drivers in Brazil.

Mercedes-Benz F1 W08 rear

Mercedes-Benz F1 W08 rear
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Photo by: Giorgio Piola

A close-up of the rear of the W08 shows not only the cooling configuration being used in Brazil but also how the rear suspension is designed to give clean flow over the diffuser.

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 detail

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 detail
11/29

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Renault introduced these bargeboards a few races ago, albeit not racing them on their first arrival. They include a secondary pre-bargeboard, stubby vertical dividing vanes between the primary pre-bargeboard and main bargeboard's footplate and revised louvres in the footplate.

Mercedes-Benz F1 W08 rear

Mercedes-Benz F1 W08 rear
12/29

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Mercedes is utilising more cooling for Brazil, with a more expansive outlet used around the forwardmost leg of the upper wishbone.

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 nose and front wing

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 nose and front wing
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Photo by: Giorgio Piola

A close-up of Renault’s front wing, parts of which have been left unpainted.

Mercedes-Benz F1 W08 front brake and wheel hub

Mercedes-Benz F1 W08 front brake and wheel hub
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

The W08’s front brake assembly during the car’s preparation, sans brake drum.

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 airbox detail

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 airbox detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

Small pitot tubes mounted on the RS17’s central airbox/rollover spar will measure airflow in the region during free practice, as the team makes preparations for the inclusion of the Halo next season.

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 barge board detail

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 barge board detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

Nicknamed the 'aerocat' by the team, this styled sidepod airflow conditioner has been a feature of the car since its launch.

Mercedes W08 rear diffuser detail

Mercedes W08 rear diffuser detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

A look at the diffuser on the Mercedes W08 including the wrap around Gurney flap extensions.

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 front wing detail

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 front wing detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

An unusual angle of the RS17’s front wing gives a good shot of the canard mounted on the inside of the endplate and the strakes that guide flow on the underside of the wing.

Williams FW40 steering wheel detail

Williams FW40 steering wheel detail
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Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The clutch paddles on Felipe Massa’s car which, much like the ones already utilised by Mercedes and Ferrari, feature a mechanism that improve the driver's relationship with the paddle. In this case a pincer-style arrangement is favoured, rather than the enclosed version used by the aforementioned.

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 floor detail

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 floor detail
20/29

Photo by: Mark Sutton

Found on the edge of the RS17’s floor, this extra floor scroll flap improves circulation in that region.

Mercedes-Benz F1 W08 front wing detail

Mercedes-Benz F1 W08 front wing detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

The strakes mounted to the underside of the W08’s front wing help control the airflow ahead of the front tyre.

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 rear

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 rear
22/29

Photo by: Mark Sutton

Close-up of the RS17’s diffuser, which has been the subject of intense development this season, primarily at the outer section, where the detached Gurney extensions are now used to form the outer wall.

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 exhaust detail

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 exhaust detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

Looking down the barrel of the gun, so to speak, the rear wing's centre mounting pylon intersects the exhaust - a design idea first introduced by Toro Rosso.

Mercedes-Benz F1 W08 aero detail

Mercedes-Benz F1 W08 aero detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

Mercedes bargeboards, which were revised just a few races ago and now include more aggressively-shaped and outturned vanes, stand upon their serrated footplates.

Williams FW40 nose detail

Williams FW40 nose detail
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Photo by: Mark Sutton

Williams' nose pillar with a slot within, a feature shared with McLaren, albeit the Woking-based team has several slots in its version.

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 rear diffuser and brake duct detail

Renault Sport F1 Team RS17 rear diffuser and brake duct detail
26/29

Photo by: Mark Sutton

A close-up of the RS17’s brake duct fins and the outer section of the diffuser.

Mercedes-Benz F1 W08 rear wing detail

Mercedes-Benz F1 W08 rear wing detail
27/29

Photo by: Mark Sutton

A close-up of the open-end style endplate louvres being utilised by Mercedes.

Sahara Force India VJM10 bargeboard

Sahara Force India VJM10 bargeboard
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Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The VJM10's bargeboards from the front indicate how airflow transitions between each vertical division.

Haas F1 Team VF-17 bargeboard

Haas F1 Team VF-17 bargeboard
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Photo by: Giorgio Piola

A sideways glance at the louvred deflector panel added by Haas in Austin.

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About this article

Series Formula 1
Event Brazilian GP
Location Autódromo José Carlos Pace
Author Matt Somerfield
Article type Top List