FIA hopes F1 teams help police loopholes in 2021 rules

The FIA is optimistic some Formula 1 teams will report any early loopholes in the 2021 technical regulations rather than exploit them, but not for "charitable" reasons.

FIA hopes F1 teams help police loopholes in 2021 rules

F1's sweeping rule changes in just over one year's time will include a significant car overhaul, cutting back the complexity of wings, eliminating bargeboards and reviving an emphasis on ground-effect aerodynamics.

During the rule-making process, some people in charge of establishing the best way to stop teams manipulating wake performance started assessing the regulations from the point of team aerodynamicists.

Read Also:

Their purpose was to try to "break the rules", which FIA head of single seater technical matters Nikolas Tombazis believes contributed more "stress-testing" of this set of regulations than any before it and meant the FIA has already beefed up potential weak points in the regulations.

"That is one part of finding out," he told Motorsport.com. "We did identify two or three areas that were not well written or well controlled and we wrote better rules in the last few months."

Additionally, Tombazis believes more potential grey areas will be brought to the governing body's attention, and will be addressed, as teams divert resources to 2021 and "start developing in anger".

"Out of the teams a fair percentage, I wouldn't say all, will take the responsible view and if they see there is an inconsistency in the rules they will be interested to report it to us and to help us find a solution," said Tombazis.

"I don't know what that could turn out to be, and hopefully we've covered most of the ground. I'm not expecting teams to do it out of a charitable cause.

"The reason teams, depending on their attitude or whether they are risk-prone or not, will do that is because they have found some loophole, they know it is against the intention of the rule, and we have up until a certain point in time to adjust the rules and make corrections.

"They don't want to necessarily spend three months on something and have the carpet pulled under their feet and lose three months.

"So sometimes some teams discover [something] and before they start spending resource there they want to be sure that it won't be somehow banned or whatever."

Tombazis's faith in this process is strengthened because he said it existed and worked "reasonably well" with the new aero rules introduced this year.

It should reduce the prospect of a team finding an equivalent of the double-diffuser device that was key to the Brawn team its dominant start to the 2009 season after a significant rules change.

Tombazis's reference to spending resource is not a nod to an incoming cost cap – which are only in effect from 2021, and will not cover development work in 2020 – but instead relates to stronger aerodynamic testing restrictions.

This amounts to a reduction of windtunnel and CFD simulations.

While the number of hours of windtunnel occupancy will rise from 480 to 500 over an eight-week aerodynamic testing period, windtunnel runs will now be capped at 400, 80 fewer than the present maximum.

That cap will be lowered by a further 80 runs from 2022 to 2025.

The limit for work known as Wind On Time, which is when the wind tunnel air speed exceeds 15m/s, will also be halved to 100 hours per ATP, while the time and processing power allowed for CFD simulations will also be restricted further.

Read Also:

shares
comments
Opinion: F1 needs new points system for more title deciders
Previous article

Opinion: F1 needs new points system for more title deciders

Next article

Ricciardo says racecraft improved thanks to midfield fights

Ricciardo says racecraft improved thanks to midfield fights
Load comments
The factors that could negate Red Bull's practice gap to Mercedes Prime

The factors that could negate Red Bull's practice gap to Mercedes

Mercedes led the way in practice for Formula 1’s first race in Jeddah, where Red Bull was off the pace on both single-lap and long runs. But, if Max Verstappen can reverse the results on Saturday, factors familiar in motorsport’s main electric single-seater category could be decisive in another close battle with Lewis Hamilton...

Formula 1
Dec 4, 2021
Why Norris doesn’t expect Mr Nice Guy praise for much longer Prime

Why Norris doesn’t expect Mr Nice Guy praise for much longer

Earning praise from rivals has been a welcome sign that Lando Norris is becoming established among Formula 1's elite. But the McLaren driver is confident that his team's upward curve can put him in the mix to contend for titles in the future, when he's hoping the compliments will be replaced by being deemed an equal adversary

Formula 1
Dec 2, 2021
What Ferrari still needs to improve to return to F1 title contention Prime

What Ferrari still needs to improve to return to F1 title contention

After a disastrous 2020 in which it slumped to sixth in the F1 constructors' standings, Ferrari has rebounded strongly and is on course to finish third - despite regulations that forced it to carryover much of its forgettable SF1000 machine. Yet while it can be pleased with its improvement, there are still steps it must make if 2022 is to yield a return to winning ways

Formula 1
Dec 2, 2021
How F1 teams and personnel react in pressurised situations Prime

How F1 teams and personnel react in pressurised situations

OPINION: The pressure is firmly on Red Bull and Mercedes as Formula 1 2021 embarks on its final double-header. How the respective teams deal with that will be a crucial factor in deciding the outcome of the drivers' and constructors' championships, as Motorsport.com's technical consultant and ex-McLaren F1 engineer Tim Wright explains.

Formula 1
Dec 1, 2021
How getting sacked from Benetton made Mercedes' Allison Prime

How getting sacked from Benetton made Mercedes' Allison

He’s had a hand in world championship-winning Formula 1 cars for Benetton, Renault and Mercedes, and was also a cog in the Schumacher-Ferrari axis. Having recently ‘moved upstairs’ as Mercedes chief technical officer, James Allison tells Stuart Codling about his career path and why being axed by Benetton was one of the best things that ever happened to him.

Formula 1
Nov 28, 2021
The remarkable qualities that propelled Kubica’s F1 comeback Prime

The remarkable qualities that propelled Kubica’s F1 comeback

It’s easy to look at Robert Kubica’s second Formula 1 career and feel a sense of sadness that he didn’t reach the heights for which he seemed destined. But as Ben Anderson discovered, performance and results are almost meaningless in this context – something more fundamental and incredible happened…

Formula 1
Nov 27, 2021
The humbling changes Ricciardo made to deliver for McLaren Prime

The humbling changes Ricciardo made to deliver for McLaren

From being lapped by his own teammate in Monaco to winning at Monza, it’s been a tumultuous first season at McLaren for Daniel Ricciardo. But, as he tells STUART CODLING, there’s more to the story of his turnaround than having a lovely summer holiday during Formula 1's summer break...

Formula 1
Nov 26, 2021
The potential benefits of losing the F1 constructors' title Prime

The potential benefits of losing the F1 constructors' title

As the battle continues to rage over the F1 2021 drivers' championship, teams up and down the grid are turning their attentions to the prize money attributed to each position in the constructors' standings. But F1's sliding scale rules governing wind tunnel and CFD use will soften the blow for those who miss out on the top places

Formula 1
Nov 25, 2021