FIA press conference

On Eurosport's regular post-race review they had a press conference with Max Mosley in Paris. I couldn't catch it all because the Dutch Eurosport commentator insisted on translating, which made him (and me) miss half the original English message.

On Eurosport's regular post-race review they had a press conference with Max Mosley in Paris. I couldn't catch it all because the Dutch Eurosport commentator insisted on translating, which made him (and me) miss half the original English message. But it went something like this:

Re: Rule changes

There will be three rule changes:

1. cars will not be allowed to drive full speed in the pits, and there will be chicane-like things to prevent them from doing so, so there will be no more 200 km/h pit exits

2. nobody will be allowed in the pits that absolutely doesn't have to be there (spectators and extra mechanics included)

3. only one (or two?) teams will be allowed in the pits at a time. Teams must pick in advance on which lap number they will come into the pits. If more than one want to come in at the same time, they will have to draw lots or something. If there is an unscheduled pit stop for a problem with the car or so, they will not be able to take on fuel or tires. [this rule may not be implemented at Monaco yet, and the teams may just agree for now on 'no pit stops']

There was also talk (I think in the context of next year) about the use of fuel meters, which could be used to limit the fuel and hence power of the engines. Interestingly, Mr. Mosely stated that "it is the direction they should be going anyway, not just more power, but more power per unit of fuel". With this device we can reduce the power as much as we want, in fact we can allow as much power as we want" (paraphrased). As well, it apparently has already been passed to change the shape of the bottom of the cars to slow them down for next year. For frontal collisions, air bags could be required. They're not so sure what to do about side collisions (to protect the head).

Re: Senna

Mr. Mosely also stated that on the lap before the crash (the first lap after the safety car left the track) Senna was not restricted by the safety car and he was travelling at 303 Km/h (at the place he want off). The next lap, when he went off, he was travelling 310 Km/h at that place. I didn't catch his next sentence, but I think the implication was that Senna may have been pushing too hard.

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My comment:

The fuel restrictions could mean bye-bye Ferrari, hello Honda again.

Would the fuel meter restrict maximum flow or average or what?

The global environmental thrust which eventually had to come through in one way or another (let's face it) may receive its impetus from this past weekend.

The refuelling was meant to have more pit-stops and more 'excitement'; now they want to reduce them actually.

Multiple cars could still come in on one lap when cars are not on the same lap in the second half of the race.

I still think most of the safety problem is with the track: run-off area too small, move walls back need gravel traps need tires on walls

-J

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Series Formula 1
Teams Ferrari