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F1 future: A big Five weeks to decide what's in and who's out

"What is good racing - it is two cars fighting each other.

Motorsport Blog

Motorsport Blog

"What is good racing - it is two cars fighting each other. It may mean the guy in front stays in front but you can have some great racing going on. It is a little bit more complex than counting the number of overtakes. Overtaking isn't good racing."

The words of F1 Managing director Ross Brawn speaking to Motorsport.com's Jon Noble for an article about the contradictions inherent in shaping the F1 of the future. We want very fast cars, which requires downforce but we want them to follow each other closely, which is hard as we all know.

This week has seen further steps towards the F1 of the future, post 2021, following up on the outline plan presented to the teams in Bahrain. The FIA, in partnership with Brawn's Liberty Media commercial ownership team, released proposals which must be finalised by the end of May. This will be the first building block of the F1 of the future and the first indication of whether Ferrari and Mercedes are in or out.

It's the technology, stupid

One of the key proposals that Brawn and his team have thoroughly evaluated with the FIA - and gone for in the end - is to get rid of the MGU-H part of the hybrid system, which was one one the most complex to get right and also one where development was 'unrestricted'.

That's a big word in modern F1. Everything is so carefully defined and there are add-ons and codicils to every clause to close loopholes, which narrow things even more and make the rule book a foot thick.

So unrestricted development gets the eyes of engine builders at manufacturer teams gleaming.

No more. The proposal on the table is to take that out of the equation.

The received wisdom is that this is a problem for Ferrari and Mercedes Honda have struggled with it and what they think about abandoning it is not on the record.

I spoke to Cyril Abiteboul of Renault recently and asked him if the MGU-H was a red line for Renault and he said that it was not. They want a healthy and competitive Formula 1 and they want Ferrari and Mercedes to stay in it.

Sources close to Porsche have told me that their F1 feasibility plan is very serious and they are more likely to enter if the MGU-H is not on the table.

So far there has not been any public reaction to the announcement from Ferrari chairman Sergio Marchionne, who had previously spoken about taking Ferrari out of F1 if the technology is watered down.

Also in the package, which could come in soon if the World Motorsport Council vote for it, is to increase the fuel allowance for the race from 105 to 110 kg, so that the engine can be used at full power at all times.

What do you think of the proposals announced this week? How do you think this will end up? Leave your comments below>

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