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F1 Commission votes in favour of new engine rules

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F1 Commission votes in favour of new engine rules
By:
Apr 29, 2016, 9:47 AM

The Formula 1 Commission has voted in favour of the manufacturers' plans to change engine rules over the next two years in a bid to bring down costs and make performance closer.

Nico Rosberg, Mercedes AMG F1 Team W07
Start action: Nico Rosberg, Mercedes AMG F1 Team W07 leads
Bernie Ecclestone, Jean Todt, FIA President and Christian Horner, Red Bull Racing Team Principal
Daniel Ricciardo, Red Bull Racing RB12 and Nico Rosberg, Mercedes AMG F1 Team W07 lead at the start of the race
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Press conference: Frederic Vasseur, Renault Sport F1 Team Racing Director, Yusuke Hasegawa, Head of Honda F1 Programme, Eric Boullier, McLaren Racing Director, Eric Boullier, McLaren Racing Director, Maurizio Arrivabene, Ferrari Team Principal, Toto Wolff, Mercedes GP Executive Director and Christian Horner, Red Bull Racing Team Principal

Although formal confirmation of the e-vote outcome is not expected to be made until later on Friday, it is understood that the plan agreed by manufacturers before the Chinese Grand Prix has received enough support to go through.

Hopes of the idea being approved at the F1 Commission meeting earlier this week had to be abandoned after absence of key members meant there was no quorum present to allow a vote to take place.

As previously reported by Motorsport.com, the engine manufacturers' agreement involves a long-term plan to reduce the number of power units to three per driver from 2018.

There will also be more standard parts, common installation of energy storage and control electronics and other moves to bring down development costs.

The outline plan is for customer costs to come down by one million Euro next year and a further three million Euro for 2018.

In a bid to equalise performance – so engines are only separated by a few tenths per lap – turbo boost could be limited to ensure a more level playing field.

There will also be a commitment from manufacturers to guarantee supply of power units at a fixed cost for all teams, in the wake of the Red Bull hunt for engines last year.

The approval of the engine plans, with the backing of the FIA, means that the independent engine concept that was mooted last year now appears to be off the table.

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Series Formula 1
Author Jonathan Noble