Brabham turned down efforts to revive name in F1

David Brabham says several parties have been interested in using his family name in Formula 1 again, with the most recent enquiry understood to have been unsuccessfully made for 2019.

Brabham turned down efforts to revive name in F1

The two-time constructors' championship-winning team last entered F1 in 1992.

David Brabham, founder Jack Brabham's son, fought to regain use of the family name in a long-running court case and now a Le Mans 24 Hours GTE Pro effort has been targeted for 2022 to relaunch the company's racing activity.

He revealed he has had "lots of conversations" about returning the name to F1.

Brabham told Motorsport.com: "From a brand point of view, if I told you how many people contacted us and said they're going to buy an F1 team and wanted to call it Brabham: it's a long list.

"But guess what, nobody was ever able to buy the team. At first you get quite excited by it but after a while you learn.

"It came to a point where you learned your lessons, and you're like 'prove you've got the funds'. Then it didn't waste our time as much."

The team was founded in the early-1960s by Jack Brabham and Ron Tauranac, with Brabham going on to win the 1966 world championship before Denny Hulme and Nelson Piquet added to its haul of titles.

However, the last of its 35 F1 wins came in 1985 and it had faded in competitiveness by the time it gave Brabham's son his F1 debut in a terrible 1990 season.

Nelson Piquet, Brabham BT54 BMW

Nelson Piquet, Brabham BT54 BMW

Photo by: LAT Images

An attempt was made by Formtech founder Franz Hilmer to enter F1 in 2010 under the Brabham Grand Prix banner.

That failed, but since David Brabham regained the right to use his family name in 2013 he has had multiple approaches over an F1 link.

He is understood to have discussed a serious option for 2019 that was ultimately unsuccessful.

No team has been specified but the reincarnated Force India outfit – known as Racing Point since last August – is the only logical option. It was preparing to unveil a new identity this month.

The rest of the grid comprises works teams, long-established independents and those already committed to individual commercial deals.

Racing Point would not comment on its planned name change when approached by Motorsport.com but appears to have now committed to retaining its late-2018 identity.

There have been several attempts to revive historic F1 names over the years.

The short-lived Lotus team in 2010 that swiftly morphed into Caterham following its own legal saga served as a warning to Brabham.

He said he was not comfortable relinquishing the use of his name to a project he could not be a key part of, claiming real family involvement gives it "credibility".

"I was involved in F1 with Brabham and I saw that affected the name, because of the lack of success and difficulties the team were going through," he said.

"I looked at Lotus and thought 'that's not how you do it'. You've got to understand the brand, what your DNA is, that your messaging about who you are is ruthlessly consistent.

"I think with Lotus there was too much confusion around the brand. I just couldn't afford to do that."

Nelson Piquet, Brabham BT48

Nelson Piquet, Brabham BT48

Photo by: Sutton Images

shares
comments
How Verstappen finessed his 'rage to win'

Previous article

How Verstappen finessed his 'rage to win'

Next article

Carey: F1 promoters criticism "a little strange"

Carey: F1 promoters criticism "a little strange"
Load comments
How Ferrari got its F1 recovery plan working Prime

How Ferrari got its F1 recovery plan working

After its worst campaign in 40 years, the famous Italian team had to bounce back in 2021 – and it appears to be delivering. Although it concedes the pole positions in Monaco and Baku paint a somewhat misleading picture of its competitiveness, the team is heading into the 2022 rules revamp on much stronger footing to go for wins again

The joy that exposes F1’s key weakness Prime

The joy that exposes F1’s key weakness

Long-awaited wins for ex-Formula 1 drivers Marcus Ericsson and Kevin Magnussen in IndyCar and IMSA last weekend gave F1 a reminder of what it is missing. But with the new rules aimed at levelling the playing field, there’s renewed optimism that more drivers can have a rewarding result when their day of days comes

Formula 1
Jun 17, 2021
The F1 figures Red Bull and Mercedes can't afford to see again Prime

The F1 figures Red Bull and Mercedes can't afford to see again

OPINION: An interloper squad got amongst the title contenders during Formula 1’s street-circuit mini-break, where Red Bull left with the points lead in both championships. But, as the campaign heads back to purpose-built venues once again, how the drivers of the two top teams compare in one crucial area will be a major factor in deciding which squad stays in or retakes the top spot

Formula 1
Jun 16, 2021
Why Alfa's boss is up to the task of securing a stronger F1 future Prime

Why Alfa's boss is up to the task of securing a stronger F1 future

Two tenth places in recent races have lifted Alfa Romeo to the head of Formula 1's 'Class C' battle in 2021, but longer-term the Swiss-based squad has far loftier ambitions. With the new 2022 rules set to level out the playing field, team boss Frederic Vasseur has good reason to be optimistic, as he explained to Motorsport.com in an exclusive interview

Formula 1
Jun 15, 2021
How Barnard's revolutionary McLaren transformed F1 car construction Prime

How Barnard's revolutionary McLaren transformed F1 car construction

The MP4/1 was pioneering by choice, but a McLaren by chance. STUART CODLING relates the tangled (carbon fibre) weaves which led to the creation of one of motor racing’s defining cars

Formula 1
Jun 15, 2021
Why the end is nigh for F1’s most dependable design tool Prime

Why the end is nigh for F1’s most dependable design tool

Wind tunnel work forms the bedrock of aerodynamic development in Formula 1. But as Pat Symonds explains, advances in virtual research are signalling the end of these expensive and complicated relics.

Formula 1
Jun 13, 2021
Why Mosley’s legacy amounts to far more than tabloid rumour Prime

Why Mosley’s legacy amounts to far more than tabloid rumour

The newspapers, naturally, lingered over Max Mosley’s tainted family history and niche sexual practices. But this is to trivialise the legacy of a big beast of motor racing politics. Stuart Codling weighs the life of a man whose work for safety on both road and track has saved hundreds of thousands of lives, but whose penchant for cruelty remains problematic and polarising.

Formula 1
Jun 12, 2021
Why pragmatic Perez isn't fazed by no-nonsense Red Bull F1 culture Prime

Why pragmatic Perez isn't fazed by no-nonsense Red Bull F1 culture

Sergio Perez has spent most of his career labouring in Formula 1’s midfield, wondering whether he’d ever get another shot at the big time. Red Bull has handed him that chance and, although life at the top is tough, the Baku winner is doing all the right things to get on terms with Max Verstappen, says BEN ANDERSON

Formula 1
Jun 11, 2021