Formula 1
Formula 1
29 Aug
-
01 Sep
Event finished
05 Sep
-
08 Sep
Event finished
19 Sep
-
22 Sep
Event finished
26 Sep
-
29 Sep
Event finished
10 Oct
-
13 Oct
Event finished
Motorsport Blog
Topic

Motorsport Blog

2017 Formula 1 cars designed to be "unbelievably quick and beautiful" says Ferrari's James Allison

shares
comments
2017 Formula 1 cars designed to be "unbelievably quick and beautiful" says Ferrari's James Allison
Jun 22, 2016, 12:16 PM

Ferrari technical director James Allison believes the 2017 Formula 1 regulations will produce cars that are more “beautiful” than the current g...

Ferrari technical director James Allison believes the 2017 Formula 1 regulations will produce cars that are more “beautiful” than the current generation.

Next year’s rules will introduce wider bodywork and front wings, wider and lower rear wings, and bigger front and rear tyres, which are all expected to make the cars look and perform faster.

Allison, who was speaking on the second day of the FIA’s 2016 Sport Conference in Turin, described how the early stages of Ferrari’s 2017 design concept suggest the new cars will be much better looking that their predecessors, which have come in for much criticism since the aerodynamic regulations were last significantly shaken up back in 2009.

Kimi Raikkonen

He said: “Formula 1 teams focus completely on function over form and what it ends up looking like is just what it ends up looking like. However, all of us – or at least the vast majority of us – want our product to be beautiful and therefore we want regulations that inherently make the cars beautiful, so that when we set out to focus on function only, the regulations naturally produce beautiful cars.

“We’ve made a little bit of a step forward to get rid of the horrible looking noses of a couple of years ago and next year’s regulations are a very conscious effort to try to make the cars both unbelievably quick and also beautiful.

“The proportions of next year’s cars are very appealing. For those of us who are lucky enough to be seeing them as they get created, they look nice. I’m looking forward to seeing them racing.”

Ferrari F1

Although the 2017 rules are expected to make the cars faster by creating higher levels of downforce, there has already been speculation that this will lead to fewer overtaking manoeuvres, as drivers will not be able to run close to the car in front.

Allison was speaking during a panel discussion on innovation and one of the key themes of this year’s FIA conference is how motorsport can learn from its past.

The British engineer, who re-joined Ferrari in 2013 after a previous spell working for the team in the early 2000s, explained that from his experience in F1, keeping employees motivated and free to express new ideas was key to success.

He said: “Innovation is absolutely at the heart of any team that wishes to be successful. There are a couple of enemies to innovation: the first is having a group of people that are too content with where they are and management that is not sufficiently challenging the organisation to improve.

James Allison Maurizio Arrivabene

“The second enemy of innovation is not giving people space to think and to bring up a new approach so that new idea can be tested and demonstrated to be better than the current one.”

Allison went on to describe Ferrari’s first effort at a V6 power unit in 2014 and used it as an example of how being satisfied by a certain level of progress was not enough to be successful in the sport.

That year, the Scuderia’s first hybrid engine was not able to perform anywhere near the level of Mercedes’ double title-winning design and the Italian team went without a Grand Prix victory for the first time since 1993.

2014 Kimi Raikkonen

Allison said: “’ll give an example of what I mean by the enemy of being satisfied by where you are. The new rules in Formula 1, the power units in 2014, they were a very big opening up of freedom compared to the previous power unit rules and were a huge challenge to the organisation to create a totally new power unit with a lot of different technology in it [and] not everyone met that challenge equally.

“Certainly in the first [year] the Ferrari was a huge step forward in efficiency over the previous one and coming up to the start of the season we felt fairly confident that we’d made a good step forwards and that was going to see us well on track.

“But it became pretty clear as soon as we started racing that it wasn’t there where [our rivals] were at. I think the lesson for us was that just making a step forward isn’t sufficient, you have to always be challenging internally to be achieving way more than you currently are, because if you don’t your competitors will.

“So having a managerial mindset that says ‘we’re not good enough’ – even if you’re the best – [saying] ‘we’re not good enough’ is important. And then allowing your engineers and staff the space to provide those innovations is the next part.”

Sebastian Vettel

What do you make of Allison’s comments? Do you think the 2017 F1 regulations will produce beautiful cars? Leave your thoughts in the comment section below or head over to the JAonF1 Facebook page for more discussion.
Next article
Tech analysis: Why Mercedes was so dominant in Baku

Previous article

Tech analysis: Why Mercedes was so dominant in Baku

Next article

Ecclestone hoping for 2017 night race at "super" Baku

Ecclestone hoping for 2017 night race at "super" Baku
Load comments

About this article

Series Formula 1
Teams Ferrari Shop Now