Rules update for 2007

TRACTION CONTROL OUT FOR '07 TORONTO, Ont. -- Traction control will not be allowed in the 2007 Parts Canada Superbike Championship, but the concept will be reviewed on an annual basis. That decision was one of several rules proposals finalized...

TRACTION CONTROL OUT FOR '07

TORONTO, Ont. -- Traction control will not be allowed in the 2007 Parts Canada Superbike Championship, but the concept will be reviewed on an annual basis. That decision was one of several rules proposals finalized by participating manufacturers and series organizer Professional Motorsports Productions in meetings last month.

Traction control, in which electronic engine aids help riders control rear wheelspin, has filtered into use in other racing series in recent years, including the World Superbike Championship. But PMP's Colin Fraser said such systems are currently too expensive to introduce into the Canadian tour.

"We pride ourselves in being a series that is very responsible in terms of costs for our competitors and trying to maintain a competitive balance," Fraser said. "Introducing traction control at this time could potentially upset that balance. We do see it as a viable option down the road, and will explore its use on an annual basis. A lot will depend on what systems are developed in the future for OE sportbike application."

A number of other rules changes designed to control costs have been added to the 2007 rulebook. Engine bore and stroke must be stock in all Parts Canada Superbike Championship classes and valve sizes must remain stock. Stock injectors must also be used.

The series consists of five national classes. In addition to the Parts Canada Superbike headline class there are support divisions for Hindle Exhaust Pro 600 Sport Bike, International Motorcycle SUPERSHOW Amateur 600 Sport Bike, Thunder twins and Suzuki SV650 National Cup.

PMP and the manufacturers did make a couple of concessions. In the Superbike class 25mm fork cartridge kits will be allowed, while quick shifters will be permitted in both the Superbike and Pro 600 Sport Bike categories. Quick shifters were eligible in Superbike last year and are considered a valuable piece of equipment because they reduce wear and tear on equipment.

"Quick shifters do make things a little bit easier," said veteran tuner Scott Miller, who will be running six-time Canadian Superbike champion Steve Crevier in the Yamaha Canada Fast Company Racing Team this season. "They take a bit of load off the transmission and can reduce the risk of damaging transmissions during the race."

Additionally, 675cc triples, like the Triumph Daytona, will be eligible for the Pro and Amateur 600 Sport Bike classes in 2007, with their inclusion to be reviewed at the end of the year. This is similar to the introduction of 750cc twin-cylinder bikes, such as Ducati's 749, into those classes last season.

"We are pleased with the balance we have struck with our rules package for 2007," Fraser said. "We want to keep a tight rein on engine modifications but we also recognize that certain developments can actually improve the life of various components and act as a cost-saving measure in the long run."

The 2007 Parts Canada Superbike Championship will consist of seven races at five venues this summer. The series will open at Le Circuit Mont- Tremblant, north of Montreal on the weekend of May 31-June 3 and conclude with its traditional Labour Day Weekend finale at Shannonville Motorsport Park, near Belleville, Ont. Aug. 31-Sept. 3.

Pirelli returns for its second year as spec tire supplier to all five national classes.

-credit: www.cdnsuperbike.com

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Series CSBK
Drivers Steve Crevier