Silverstone Classic summary

SILVERSTONE CELEBRATES ANOTHER CLASSIC 2008 Silverstone Classic announced for 25-26-27 July - - Next year's theme will be 60 years of Silverstone - A record crowd of 41,000 gathered at Silverstone this weekend (27-29 July) to witness a...

SILVERSTONE CELEBRATES ANOTHER CLASSIC

2008 Silverstone Classic announced for 25-26-27 July - - Next year's theme will be 60 years of Silverstone - A record crowd of 41,000 gathered at Silverstone this weekend (27-29 July) to witness a feast of world class motorsport at this year's Silverstone Classic, in association with Bonhams. The crowd figure was 3,000 up on the three-day attendance in 2006, and means that next year's event will be eagerly anticipated. The 2008 Silverstone Classic, announced for 25-26-27 July, will celebrate 60 years of Silverstone, to mark the diamond anniversary of the circuit's first ever meeting, the 1948 British Grand Prix.

"We are delighted with the way the Silverstone Classic is developing and have had a fantastic weekend crowd of 41,000", said Richard Phillips, Managing Director of Silverstone Circuits Limited. Phillips continued, "The Silverstone Classic continues to go from strength to strength and would not be such a success without the support of the competitors, the enthusiasm of the car clubs, and the dedication from all the marshals and volunteers who put in such long hours over all three days of the event. We are also delighted to announce that the 2008 Silverstone Classic will take place on 25-27 July and will celebrate 60 years of Silverstone."

The weekend's racing was topped by a superb double win for Peter Dunn and his 1976 March 761. On Sunday, Dunn beat 26 rivals to win the Daily Express Silverstone International Trophy for Invitation Formula One Cars with Grand Prix Masters, having already claimed the silverware from Saturday's James Hunt Trophy -- presented to him by James Hunt's son, Freddie, who had earlier driven his father's Hesketh 308C on a demonstration lap around the famous Historic Grand Prix circuit. The honours in the hotly contested Group C/GTP races were shared. Gary Pearson won on Saturday with his Jaguar XJR-11, while Andy Purdie triumphed on Sunday at the wheel of his Porsche 962C.

It was a disappointing weekend for Le Mans legend Derek Bell. The five time Le Mans and triple Daytona 24 hours winner was lying third in Sunday's Group C/GTP race, but retired his Porsche 962C to the pits with mechanical problems, thought to have resulted from a first-corner collision when car owner Mark Sumpter was at the wheel. Bell did not start either of the Formula One races because his Surtees TS9B's engine failed during qualifying. Fellow Le Mans winner Andy Wallace was also a non-finisher in the same Group C/GTP race. Driving the 1990 24 Hours-winning Jaguar XJR-12, he succumbed to low oil pressure.

But at least one Le Mans hero had a good result - the Aston Martin DBR1 that won in 1959, in the hands of Roy Salvadori and Carroll Shelby, scooped the Roy Salvadori Trophy - an emotional moment for current driver Nick Leventis. The Astons that fought it out for the Salvadori Trophy took another honour, when they were declared Best Race Paddock of the weekend.

The BMW Car Club won the title of Best Car Club Display, while Alan Cooper, from Peebles in Scotland, won the Marshals Draw supported by Small Luxury Hotels of the World. He has won two nights at the Small Luxury Hotel of his choice.

Away from the track the famous Scarf & Goggles entertainment area, a period fun fair and a whole host of other entertainment - including a screening of the classic Steve McQueen film, Le Mans -- catered for young and old, ensuring the three-day event was enjoyed by the record crowd.

-credit: silverstone

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