South Boston Bailey's 300 practice summary

Drivers heat up South Boston in preparation for Nov. 9 Bailey's 300. SOUTH BOSTON, VA (NOV. 3, 2002)-- It might have been a chilly early autumn day, but nearly 30 cars kept Big Daddy's South Boston Speedway hot Oct. 30 in an open practice...

Drivers heat up South Boston in preparation for Nov. 9 Bailey's 300.

SOUTH BOSTON, VA (NOV. 3, 2002)-- It might have been a chilly early autumn day, but nearly 30 cars kept Big Daddy's South Boston Speedway hot Oct. 30 in an open practice session for the Nov. 9 Bailey's 300 Hometown Challenge.

Though there were no formal speed records taken, most cars were practicing in the low 16-second range, about average for the Late Model division at South Boston.

Among those present at the practice session were Timothy Peters, Wayne Grubb, David Triplett, Peyton Sellers, Maurice Hill, Mark McFarland, Denny Hamlin and Eric Sartin, all trying to find that perfect setup that will enable them to be among the 36 elite drivers to make the Bailey's 300 feature. Already more than 60 cars have entered to try their hand at the famed four-tenths mile oval.

Some drivers used the practice session as an initiation to Big Daddy's South Boston Speedway and a time to learn what really makes the track so tough. Rookie driver James Ramsey of Fallston, Md., was among those drivers. Ramsey typically runs at Southampton Motor Speedway and Old Dominion Speedway.

"The track's completely different than any of the tracks I've ran [like] the line where you get on the gas," he commented. "We'll be alright for Saturday I think."

While this wasn't Danny Fair's first trip to South Boston, he said the practice session was still a good learning experience for him. The Manassas, Va., driver last visited the track while it was still in its old .357-mile configuration. A few changes made to the car throughout the session made Fair feel more confident going into next weekend.

"It wasn't really running that fast, but it did feel real comfortable while I was out there," he said. "This day really helped. If we had come down next weekend and had never been here, we'd have been in left field."

The Bailey's 300 Hometown Challenge trophy has become one of the most coveted in Late Model racing for several reasons. Already the race is one of the richest, paying $15,000 to win. The recently announced Bailey's Bonanza promotion could add an additional $15,000 to that purse should one of the top five qualifiers win the race after electing to start at the rear of the field. This promotion will also make a lucky fan $10,000 richer. The icing on the cake is national television coverage. The Speed Channel will air the Bailey's 300 2 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 23 and 5 p.m., Monday, Nov. 25.

Tickets are still available to watch one of the best Late Model races of the season in person. Adult tickets are $20 in advance or $25 at the gate. Reserved seats are $30 in advance or $35 at the gate. Youth age 10 to 15 are $10, and children nine and under are free. A limited number of backstretch tickets will be available raceday only for $15.

Grandstand gates for the Bailey's 300 Hometown Challenge open at 9 a.m. Qualifying begins at 10 a.m. Heat races start at noon, and the Bailey's 300 takes green at 3 p.m.

To purchase tickets, fans can call Big Daddy's South Boston Speedway toll-free at 1-877-440-1540 or by logging on to www.tickets.com. More information on the Bailey's 300 Hometown Challenge can be accessed at www.southbostonspeedway.com.

-sbs-

Be part of something big

Write a comment
Show comments
About this article
Series Stock car
Drivers Mark McFarland , Denny Hamlin , Timothy Peters , Peyton Sellers