Talladega: Chris Osborne - Friday media visit

From the Spotter's Stand with Chris Osborne - Spotter for Kurt Busch, No. 2 Miller Lite Dodge and Justin Allgaier, No. 12 Verizon Wireless Dodge WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES OF BEING A SPOTTER AT A RESTRICTOR-PLATE RACE LIKE TALLADEGA? "I don't know...

From the Spotter's Stand with Chris Osborne - Spotter for Kurt Busch, No. 2 Miller Lite Dodge and Justin Allgaier, No. 12 Verizon Wireless Dodge

WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES OF BEING A SPOTTER AT A RESTRICTOR-PLATE RACE LIKE TALLADEGA? "I don't know if it's a bigger challenge than any other track. You're just 'eyes on the driver' every corner, paying attention to what's going on all the time. It's a lot tighter racing for the duration of the race. You talk to your driver a lot more at a (restrictor) plate race than you do anywhere else. You're constantly letting your driver know what's going on two cars in front of him and everything behind him. When the cars start fanning out, you have to let your drivers know where that line is coming from, what line is moving, so there's a lot more intensity here and you have to maintain an even keel more than you do anywhere else. There's a lot more information and it is driver preference as to how much information they want to hear. I haven't found a driver yet that doesn't want everything that you can give him at a plate race."

BECAUSE THERE IS SO MUCH GOING ON, CAN YOU "OVER SPOT" A RACE? "I don't think so. I think the more information that you give a driver the better off they are during a race. They almost have a filtration system built in their brains that they absorb what they need and throw out what they don't. I just don't think that you can give them too much information."

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENCES IN SPOTTING FOR KURT AND JUSTIN? "Here at the plate races, there's really not a difference between the two. Kurt (Busch) doesn't use quite as much information as Justin (Allgaier) on any other track. But here at the plate races, there's really not a difference between the two. Provide as much information as you can give both of them, especially if you get down to the last 10-15 laps. That's when the pace picks up and some of the helmets turn around inside the car and you just have to make sure that you stay calm and keep your driver in the loop about what's going on. You really don't give your driver any more or any less information, it's just when you have to be on your game for the things that are going to happen. There's going to be a lot more chances taken in that duration, trying to get the best finish you can and get a win out of it. If you're up there in the mix, that's when crazy thing tend to happen."

WHEN THE PACE OF THE RACE DOES PICK UP, HOW DOES A SPOTTER CONTROL HIS EMOTIONS? "You just have to find an even keel. The calmer that we are on the radio, it seems like the calmer the driver stays. If we get out of the control, they normally do too. At Texas last weekend, Kurt (Busch) has a big wreck in front of him late in the race and the last thing that I need to do was get emotional over the radio. He has enough things going on inside the car, me hollering over the radio never helps. The tone of the voice has to stay the same."

HOW DO YOU SPOT THE "BIG ONE" AT TALLADEGA? "You really can't prepare for it. It just really depends on where you are in the pack (of cars) and what's going on around you. It's just spur of the moment, give your driver all the information you can as fast as you can and hope that you can make it out the other side."

-source: dodge motorsports

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About this article
Series NASCAR Sprint Cup
Drivers Kurt Busch , Justin Allgaier