Stanley Barrett Realistic About Rookie Year

Barrett taking realistic approach to rookie year By Brett Borden DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (Jan. 8, 1999) It would be one heck of a stunt for a relatively unknown rookie to come in and shake up the veterans in the world of NASCAR Winston Cup...

Barrett taking realistic approach to rookie year By Brett Borden

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (Jan. 8, 1999) It would be one heck of a stunt for a relatively unknown rookie to come in and shake up the veterans in the world of NASCAR Winston Cup Series racing -- or one heck of a stuntman. Enter Stanton Barrett. But, instead of throwing his body through plate glass windows and off of tall buildings, the 26-year-old stuntman -- and son of the original 'Skoal Bandit' in the NASCAR Winston Cup Series, Stan Barrett -- has thrown his hat into the ring known as NASCAR Winston Cup Series racing. There's no safety net for rookies in the series, so Barrett has his work cut out for him. But he knows that. "I raced down here in the 24 hours back in '96," Barrett said. "This is completely different. We're going to run 16-18 races this year to build our team to what it needs to be competitive for 2000. This year we're learning to gel chemistry-wise. I've worked with my crew chief for six years. So as far as that goes, we all know what we want, we all trust each other, and we know what we require. "Other than that, we're going to build the rest of our crew, the rest of our cars and equipment and our motor program, and get everything ready so that we can be competitive in the year 2000. That's our goals this year. Build our sponsor awareness more. And build better relations within the whole sport." The first step in that plan came Wednesday and Thursday at Daytona International Speedway, when Barrett tested his No. 84 PBH Motorsports Chevrolet Monte Carlo for the first time on a NASCAR Winston Cup Series venue. On Thursday, he posted the fifth-fastest speed out of six drivers to test the historic 2.5-mile superspeedway. Barrett was not disappointed, however. "We're reaching our goals," he said. "We're just trying different things like everybody else, different combinations with shocks ... We haven't run this car before, so we have to figure out how low we can go before we start scraping and then put our bumps there -- adjust the ride heights. And then work with different shock combinations and different engine deals and gears. "Being new with new equipment that we haven't worked with before and a new motor program, there's just a lot of things that you have to test before you can even get to the point that some of these other guys are testing. By the time we come back to the manufacturers' test we'll be where we need to be." The next GM manufacturer's test comes Jan. 19-20 at Daytona. It is a test that counts against each team's allotment of seven tests for the year, so many more teams will be testing the next time around. "We've made a lot of progress, and we're comfortable with where we're running," Barrett said. "We'd like to be faster, but I think after we go back to the shop and take the information that we've learned and adjust the car to where we need to be, then come back down. I don't think we're behind at all, we just have a lot of homework to do. "We're making headway and we're doing what we want. We didn't come down here to set the world on fire. We just came down here to learn as much as we could from everybody else and learn what we could from our information and just try to make the best race car we can make." Barrett's best speed was ultimately 187.457 in what was reportedly an ex-Hendrick Motorsports Chevy from Jeff Gordon's shop.

Source: NASCAR Online

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About this article
Series Monster Energy NASCAR Cup
Drivers Jeff Gordon , Stanton Barrett
Teams Hendrick Motorsports