Car of Tomorrow Charlotte LMS test 2006-05-30

Car of Tomorrow Tests at Lowe's Motor Speedway Group runs provide good feedback to NASCAR and to teams CONCORD, N.C. (May 30, 2006) -- For the first time in its developmental stages, NASCAR's Car of Tomorrow ran in groups of 6-8 cars with ...

Car of Tomorrow Tests at Lowe's Motor Speedway
Group runs provide good feedback to NASCAR and to teams

CONCORD, N.C. (May 30, 2006) -- For the first time in its developmental stages, NASCAR's Car of Tomorrow ran in groups of 6-8 cars with the aerodynamic wing attached to the rear, as the first of a two-day test session got underway Tuesday at Lowe's Motor Speedway. The feedback NASCAR received from the drivers was positive and all indications are that the aero push in the group runs should make for some compelling racing.

Teams from Hendrick Motorsports (Brian Vickers), Richard Childress Racing (Jeff Burton), DEI (Martin Truex, Jr.), Penske Racing South (Ryan Newman), Evernham Motorsports (Scott Riggs), Joe Gibbs Racing (Denny Hamlin), Chip Ganassi (Casey Mears), and MB2 Motorsports (Joe Nemechek) participated in Tuesday's test.

"We received some excellent feedback from the teams and drivers today," said Robin Pemberton, NASCAR Vice President for Competition. "They were able to run in a pack today for the first time with the wing and for the most part, everyone liked what they saw out there. We'll take this information, discuss it as a group, and come back Wednesday and test again. We're optimistic about running this car with the wing and the type of aero push it is able to give us."

Following a series of single car runs in the morning, the teams met following a lunch break and then went through a pair of 20-lap group runs. The purpose of the morning session was to allow each driver to get comfortable driving the car, while the afternoon segment was designed to determine how the cars would run side-by-side and in groups.

Ryan Newman, driver of the No. 12 Alltel Dodge, said that while this was his first time driving the Penske Racing South's Car of Tomorrow model, he was encouraged with the performance.

"This was our first Car of Tomorrow test and we have something to work from now, that's for sure," said Newman. "Our car was a little tight, but it really felt like it was easier to pass than in the regular (NASCAR NEXTEL) Cup cars. The aero push was pretty good. I think we took some pretty big steps out there today."

Jeff Burton, driver of the No. 31 Cingular Chevrolet, has participated in three of the four Car of Tomorrow tests this year, and continues to be impressed by the way the car handles on the track.

"I really like how our car drove out there today," said Burton. "Simply put, it drives like a race car. I think you will continue to see some subtle changes in the body of the car, but for the most part, we're locked in with the center part of the chasis. I think this is the fourth Car of Tomorrow we've built and we've been able to accumulate a great deal of track time and gather a lot of information. To NASCAR's credit, they've really moved this project along."

The teams are scheduled to test again Wednesday at Lowe's Motor Speedway, beginning at 9 a.m.

The Car of Tomorrow is the culmination of a five-year design program by NASCAR's Research and Development Center. Of primary significance are safety innovations; performance and competition; and cost efficiency for the teams. The new car will begin competition in 2007 at the spring race at Bristol Motor Speedway and will race at 16 different events next season. The 2008 Car of Tomorrow implementation schedule includes 26 events. Teams will run the entire 2009 schedule with the Car of Tomorrow.

-nascar-

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About this article
Series NASCAR Sprint Cup
Drivers Jeff Burton , Joe Nemechek , Ryan Newman , Casey Mears , Scott Riggs , Martin Truex Jr. , Brian Vickers , Denny Hamlin
Teams Richard Childress Racing , Team Penske , Hendrick Motorsports , Joe Gibbs Racing